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'Lady Bird' director commits to never working with Woody Allen again in a firm statement.

After sidestepping questions about past work with Allen, the 'Lady Bird' director makes her position clear.

'Lady Bird' director commits to never working with Woody Allen again in a firm statement.

Greta Gerwig and her film "Lady Bird" had a big night the Golden Globe Awards.

The film landed the award for Best Motion Picture (Musical or Comedy), and star Saoirse Ronan nabbed that category's Best Actress designation. Though Gerwig, who wrote and directed the film, was snubbed when it came to Best Director honors — somehow, she wasn't even nominated — it was a great night for her work.

Gerwig, flanked by "Lady Bird" stars Laurie Metcalf (L) and Saoirse Ronan (R) take photos after winning the award for Best Motion Picture, Musical or Comedy, during the 2018 Golden Globe Awards. Photo by Frederick J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images.


Like many in Hollywood, Gerwig wore black to the awards in solidarity with others pushing back on sexual harassment and assault in the entertainment industry — which made one of the post-awards questions she received a bit awkward.

Backstage at the awards, BuzzFeed reporter Susan Cheng asked Gerwig a question about her past decision to work with Woody Allen, who has been accused of molesting his adoptive daughter Dylan Farrow when she was just 7 years old. Gerwig and Allen both worked on 2012's "To Rome With Love." Her answer to Cheng's question left a lot to be desired.

"It’s something that I have thought deeply about, and I care deeply about ... and I haven’t had the opportunity to have an in-depth discussion where I come down on one side or the other, but it’s something that I’ve definitely taken to heart," she told Cheng.

It echoed a similar response she delivered in a November interview with NPR's Terry Gross, in which she deflected a bit from the question at hand.

Before the show, Farrow wondered why Time's Up and the #MeToo movement had spared her father.

"I thought it would make a difference," she wrote, referring to a 2014 post detailing the abuse Allen had inflicted on her. "I thought things would change. I learned quickly (and painfully) that my optimism was misplaced. His time wasn’t up."

"The people who join this movement without taking any kind of personal accountability for the ways in which their own words and decisions have helped to perpetuate the culture they are fighting against, that’s hard for me to reconcile," she told BuzzFeed, a nod to many of the actors who've continued to work alongside her father.

Gerwig and Allen at the 2012 premiere of "To Rome With Love." Photo by Jason Merritt/Getty Images.

On Jan. 9, Gerwig finally addressed the issue head-on in an interview with The New York Times, acknowledging the cognitive dissonance involved in some of her past statements.

Asked whether people who've been outed as sexual predators — such as Allen, Kevin Spacey, and Roman Polanski — should ever work again, Gerwig seized the opportunity to issue a firm, unambiguous statement on her personal employment history with Allen.

"I would like to speak specifically to the Woody Allen question, which I have been asked about a couple of times recently, as I worked for him on a film that came out in 2012. It is something that I take very seriously and have been thinking deeply about, and it has taken me time to gather my thoughts and say what I mean to say. I can only speak for myself and what I’ve come to is this: If I had known then what I know now, I would not have acted in the film. I have not worked for him again, and I will not work for him again. Dylan Farrow’s two different pieces made me realize that I increased another woman’s pain, and I was heartbroken by that realization. I grew up on his movies, and they have informed me as an artist, and I cannot change that fact now, but I can make different decisions moving forward."

Gerwig speaks on stage after winning Best Picture, Comedy or Musical, at the Golden Globe Awards. Photo by Paul Drinkwater/NBCUniversal via Getty Images.

Compared to what usually passes for a statement of clarification or apology in the entertainment industry, this was really, really good. A lot has changed in the world since 2012, and even since November 2017, and it's fair to say that Gerwig has grown a lot in the years after "To Rome With Love" came out. She can't change her decision to work with Allen in the past, but she can commit to using what she now knows to inform what she does in the future.

Photo by Daniel Schludi on Unsplash
True

The global eradication of smallpox in 1980 is one of international public health's greatest successes. But in 1966, seven years after the World Health Organization announced a plan to rid the world of the disease, smallpox was still widespread. The culprits? A lack of funds, personnel and vaccine supply.

Meanwhile, outbreaks across South America, Africa, and Asia continued, as the highly contagious virus continued to kill three out of every 10 people who caught it, while leaving many survivors disfigured. It took a renewed commitment of resources from wealthy nations to fulfill the promise made in 1959.

Forty-one years later, although we face a different virus, the potential for vast destruction is just as great, and the challenges of funding, personnel and supply are still with us, along with last-mile distribution. Today, while 30% of the U.S. population is fully vaccinated, with numbers rising every day, there is an overwhelming gap between wealthy countries and the rest of the world. It's becoming evident that the impact on the countries getting left behind will eventually boomerang back to affect us all.

Photo by ismail mohamed - SoviLe on Unsplash

The international nonprofit CARE recently released a policy paper that lays out the case for U.S. investment in a worldwide vaccination campaign. Founded 75 years ago, CARE works in over 100 countries and reaches more than 90 million people around the world through multiple humanitarian aid programs. Of note is the organization's worldwide reputation for its unshakeable commitment to the dignity of people; they're known for working hand-in-hand with communities and hold themselves to a high standard of accountability.

"As we enter into our second year of living with COVID-19, it has become painfully clear that the safety of any person depends on the global community's ability to protect every person," says Michelle Nunn, CARE USA's president and CEO. "While wealthy nations have begun inoculating their populations, new devastatingly lethal variants of the virus continue to emerge in countries like India, South Africa and Brazil. If vaccinations don't effectively reach lower-income countries now, the long-term impact of COVID-19 will be catastrophic."

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Canva

As millions of Americans have raced to receive the COVID-19 vaccine, millions of others have held back. Vaccine hesitancy is nothing new, of course, especially with new vaccines, but the information people use to weigh their decisions matters greatly. When choices based on flat-out wrong information can literally kill people, it's vital that we fight disinformation every which way we can.

Researchers at the Center for Countering Digital Hate, a not-for-profit non-governmental organization dedicated to disrupting online hate and misinformation, and the group Anti-Vax Watch performed an analysis of social media posts that included false claims about the COVID-19 vaccines between February 1 and March 16, 2021. Of the disinformation content posted or shared more than 800,000 times, nearly two-thirds could be traced back to just 12 individuals. On Facebook alone, 73% of the false vaccine claims originated from those 12 people.

Dubbed the "Disinformation Dozen," these 12 anti-vaxxers have an outsized influence on social media. According to the CCDH, anti-vaccine accounts have a reach of more than 59 million people. And most of them have been spreading disinformation with impunity.

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Photo by Daniel Schludi on Unsplash
True

The global eradication of smallpox in 1980 is one of international public health's greatest successes. But in 1966, seven years after the World Health Organization announced a plan to rid the world of the disease, smallpox was still widespread. The culprits? A lack of funds, personnel and vaccine supply.

Meanwhile, outbreaks across South America, Africa, and Asia continued, as the highly contagious virus continued to kill three out of every 10 people who caught it, while leaving many survivors disfigured. It took a renewed commitment of resources from wealthy nations to fulfill the promise made in 1959.

Forty-one years later, although we face a different virus, the potential for vast destruction is just as great, and the challenges of funding, personnel and supply are still with us, along with last-mile distribution. Today, while 30% of the U.S. population is fully vaccinated, with numbers rising every day, there is an overwhelming gap between wealthy countries and the rest of the world. It's becoming evident that the impact on the countries getting left behind will eventually boomerang back to affect us all.

Photo by ismail mohamed - SoviLe on Unsplash

The international nonprofit CARE recently released a policy paper that lays out the case for U.S. investment in a worldwide vaccination campaign. Founded 75 years ago, CARE works in over 100 countries and reaches more than 90 million people around the world through multiple humanitarian aid programs. Of note is the organization's worldwide reputation for its unshakeable commitment to the dignity of people; they're known for working hand-in-hand with communities and hold themselves to a high standard of accountability.

"As we enter into our second year of living with COVID-19, it has become painfully clear that the safety of any person depends on the global community's ability to protect every person," says Michelle Nunn, CARE USA's president and CEO. "While wealthy nations have begun inoculating their populations, new devastatingly lethal variants of the virus continue to emerge in countries like India, South Africa and Brazil. If vaccinations don't effectively reach lower-income countries now, the long-term impact of COVID-19 will be catastrophic."

Keep Reading Show less