Any time a mass shooting occurs in America—which is basically every week at this point—hoards of people start blaming "mental health." Despite the fact that every other developed nation also has people with mental illnesses and nowhere near our mass shooting numbers, mental health becomes the scapegoat for people who insist that gun violence has nothing to do with guns.

On the surface, it may seem like a plausible enough theory. After all, no one in a sane state of mind walks into a concert, a shopping center, or a place of worship and starts shooting people randomly. Such folks are clearly not right in the head, so "mental health" seems like a logical place to go.

RELATED: Twice as many American children die from gun violence as police officers and soldiers combined

But according to the American Psychological Association—the actual experts in mental health—that blame is misplaced. Instead, they say, the toxic combination of "easy access to assault weapons and hateful rhetoric" and the "negative cognitive and behavioral effects" of racism are the ills that we really need to be addressing if we want to stop mass killings.

APA President Rosie Phillips Davis, PhD, released the following statement on the shootings in El Paso and Dayton. It's worth reading in full:

Keep Reading Show less
Most Shared

It’s no secret that the field of mental healthcare attracts individuals who’ve received mental healthcare themselves. Most of us become therapists because we’ve either needed therapy or benefitted from it. (Or both!)

I’m a child and family therapist. I also happen to have my own mental illness.

While some may argue that my mental illness impacts my work in a negative way, I believe it provides me with additional insight and skill. I’m a therapist with mental illness and, while my work is challenging, I’m better because of it.

Keep Reading Show less
Family

After almost three years of being diagnosed with anxiety and depression, I recently found out that I have bipolar disorder.

Taking six pills daily is what keeps me afloat. I'm writing this in the hope that it will help just one person feel confident enough to seek help. Or to speak out and break the stigma surrounding mental health.

Pill shaming is toxic, and it's time to break down the societal taboo. Having a mental illness is hard enough as it is without the pill shaming stigma that floats among those struggling. There is so much misinformation out there about antidepressants and antipsychotic drugs — that they're addictive or that you're weak for taking them.

Keep Reading Show less
Family

One week, 2 tragic deaths, and alarming stats on suicide: America, this is a wake-up call.

Since 1999, suicide rates in the United States have risen nearly 30%.

After two devastating celebrity suicides, the country is talking about the profound impact of mental health issues.

Designer Kate Spade and celebrity chef and television host Anthony Bourdain both died by suicide within just a few days of each other. It's two headline-grabbing instances indicative of a terrifying situation in our country.

Photos by Slaven Vlasic/Getty Images (left) and Mark Mainz/Getty Images (right).

Keep Reading Show less
Family