She had a candid chat with kids about LGBTQ Pride. It was hilariously heartfelt.

What do kids really think about LGBTQ Pride month?

"CBC Life's" Jessi Cruickshank wanted to know. So she got a roundtable of four kids together and asked. Their funny, smart, and surprisingly heartening answers really are worth a watch:

My favorite kid snippets include:

On what it means to come out of the closet: "When you're playing hide and seek ... and someone finds you and you have to come out of the closet and you have to be it."

On if it'd be cool to have two moms: "If the house is full of girls and there's no boys in sight ... you wouldn't have to flush the toilet for the boys."




One-liners aside, the segment serves as a hopeful reminder that most kids today see being LGBTQ as perfectly normal and acceptable.

"What do you think of gay marriage?" Cruickshank asks at one point.

"I just think it's normal marriage," a woke little boy answers without missing a beat.

"My auntie — I know that she's gay," another girl answered, totally unfazed by her aunt's queerness. "She's not married yet, but I'm wondering if I'm going to be her flower girl."

They're telling exchanges.

Let this pic remind you that LGBTQ Pride Month isn't just for adults! There are lots of ways kids can celebrate and learn about Pride, too. Photo by Andrej Isakovic/AFP/Getty Images.

Research shows the younger a person is, the more likely they're accepting of LGBTQ people.

Throughout the past few decades, sweeping legislation has followed a wave of queer acceptance in the U.S. and other Western countries, with younger generations largely leading the way.

That progress isn't concrete, to be sure — backlash to social change can be an equally powerful force — but the trend lines still paint a bright, rainbow-colored future for LGBTQ people.

And that's worth remembering during Pride month.

"Guys, I'm so impressed with you!" Cruickshank concluded the segment. "Remember, what are we to the gay community? We are ..."

"Gay icons," one kid answered flatly.

That you are, little guy.

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As millions of Americans have raced to receive the COVID-19 vaccine, millions of others have held back. Vaccine hesitancy is nothing new, of course, especially with new vaccines, but the information people use to weigh their decisions matters greatly. When choices based on flat-out wrong information can literally kill people, it's vital that we fight disinformation every which way we can.

Researchers at the Center for Countering Digital Hate, a not-for-profit non-governmental organization dedicated to disrupting online hate and misinformation, and the group Anti-Vax Watch performed an analysis of social media posts that included false claims about the COVID-19 vaccines between February 1 and March 16, 2021. Of the disinformation content posted or shared more than 800,000 times, nearly two-thirds could be traced back to just 12 individuals. On Facebook alone, 73% of the false vaccine claims originated from those 12 people.

Dubbed the "Disinformation Dozen," these 12 anti-vaxxers have an outsized influence on social media. According to the CCDH, anti-vaccine accounts have a reach of more than 59 million people. And most of them have been spreading disinformation with impunity.

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Nicole Abate, a Registered Medical-Surgical Nurse living in New Mexico, starts her workday around 5:00 a.m. During her 20-minute drive to work, she gets to watch the sun rise over the Sandia Mountains as she sips her coffee.

"It's one of my favorite things to do," said Nurse Abate. "A lot of us need a little calm before the storm."

Nicole | Heroes Behind the Masks Presented by CeraVe youtu.be

In March 2020, after a fairly quiet start to the year, Nurse Abate's unit became the official COVID unit for her hospital. "It went full force after that," she says. Abate was afraid, overwhelmed with uncertainty, never knowing what was next on the wild roller coaster in this new territory, "just when you think ...we know exactly what we're doing, boom, something else hits so you adapt… that's part of nursing too." Abate faced her responsibilities courageously and with grace, as she always does, making life a little better for patients and their families "Thank you for taking care of my father," reads one recent letter from a patient's family. "You were kind, attentive and strong and we are truly grateful."

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