Kindergarteners were asked where they'd want to time travel and the answers are incredible

If you ever want to gain a whole new perspective on life, talk to a classroom full of 5-year-olds. Young kids approach the world with refreshing innocence and delightful wonder, and their perspective can teach us all some valuable lessons.

George Pointon often shares conversations he has with his year one students (the equivalent of kindergarten in the U.S.) on Twitter, with questions such as "What's the best thing that's ever happened to you?" or "What do adults do for fun? and they are always entertaining. The latest question he asked his students—"If you could time travel, where would you go?"—resulted in some hilariously meaningful answers. And Pointon's analysis of their answers makes them even funnier.

Alice answered, "to after school."

"Straight off to a belter here," Pointon wrote. "She could go anywhere. I mean literally wherever, whenever (said Shakira). But Alice has decided to use this omnipotence to move, 47 minutes into the future. I took it personally to be honest. My lessons aren't that bad."

Poor Mr. Pointon.


Katie had a similar answer, "So I can go to the park."

"There is a park literally outside the school, so, again, Katie also wants to use her power to travel 40 minutes ahead of time. I'm annoyed but I do appreciate and love the innocence of it. Why live more than today? Today is the best we have."

There's that out-of-the-mouths-of-babes wisdom we love to see. Live in the now. Don't yearn for a different time or another season. Be present in the present and make the most of it.

Of course, we all see things differently and Jack had a whole other approach to the question. "Back in time REALLY far."

By "REALLY far," Jack meant 1999. So he could do nothing but go swimming. Pointon is right—time travel is wasted on the young.

Unless we're talking about Toby's answer, which was "Meet my mum as a baby." Yes. Brilliant. Perfectly sweet film storyline that's probably already been done but who cares.

Or "selfless and kind" Emma, "Floremma Nightingale," who said she would "take medicine back to old times." Oh, my heart.

Pointon's threads like this often feature particularly funny responses from Mikey, who for this questions simply answered "Breakfast."

"Normally I use this platform to dismantle Mikey's answers," Pointon wrote. "Not today. He is staying at his Nana's and she made Chocolate Chip Pancakes this morning with a banana milkshake. I can only agree with him. Forgot seeing Plato or The Beatles. Nans pancakes please."

And just when you thought it was all sweet, light-hearted fun, Ravi chimed in with "See my Grandpa again." Cue the tears and grab the tissues, because he said they played marbles together. MARBLES. Oof.

Rosie brought us back, though, with "Go to the cinema to see Hotel Transylvania 2." Right on, Rosie. No home TV experience compares to going to the movies.

Wendy wouldn't because she doesn't want to. You do you, Wendy. Don't let anyone dim that independent spirit.

And Ben, who wants to "Go to New York with the dinosaurs"? Thank you for the reminder that 5-year-olds and dinosaurs are a timeless pair, even if New York didn't exist until millions of years after they were all dead.

And then, finally, there's Susanna, the disgruntled-but-honest older sister whose brother had to come along and ruin her young life by existing. Hope you work through that by second grade, Susanna.

Seriously, little kids are the best. I don't know how kindergarten teachers make it through the day without writing down every other hilarious or surprisingly deep thing their students say.

Thank you, Mr. Pointon, for sharing these gems with the world. (You can follow him on Twitter @GeorgePointon_ for more kid-inspired wisdom and fun.)

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When a pet is admitted to a shelter it can be a traumatizing experience. Many are afraid of their new surroundings and are far from comfortable showing off their unique personalities. The problem is that's when many of them have their photos taken to appear in online searches.

Chewy, the pet retailer who has dedicated themselves to supporting shelters and rescues throughout the country, recognized the important work of a couple in Tampa, FL who have been taking professional photos of shelter pets to help get them adopted.

"If it's a photo of a scared animal, most people, subconsciously or even consciously, are going to skip over it," pet photographer Adam Goldberg says. "They can't visualize that dog in their home."

Adam realized the importance of quality shelter photos while working as a social media specialist for the Humane Society of Broward County in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

"The photos were taken top-down so you couldn't see the size of the pet, and the flash would create these red eyes," he recalls. "Sometimes [volunteers] would shoot the photos through the chain-link fences."

That's why Adam and his wife, Mary, have spent much of their free time over the past five years photographing over 1,200 shelter animals to show off their unique personalities to potential adoptive families. The Goldbergs' wonderful work was recently profiled by Chewy in the video above entitled, "A Day in the Life of a Shelter Pet Photographer."

4-year-old New Zealand boy and police share toys.

Sometimes the adorableness of small children is almost too much to take.

According to the New Zealand Police, a 4-year-old called the country's emergency number to report that he had some toys for them—and that's only the first cute thing to happen in this story.

After calling 111 (the New Zealand equivalent to 911), the preschooler told the "police lady" who answered the call that he had some toys for her. "Come over and see them!" he said to her.

The dispatcher asked where he was, and then the boy's father picked up. He explained that the kids' mother was sick and the boy had made the call while he was attending to the other child. After confirming that there was no emergency—all in a remarkably calm exchange—the call was ended. The whole exchange was so sweet and innocent.

But then it went to another level of wholesome. The dispatcher put out a call to the police units asking if anyone was available to go look at the 4-year-old's toys. And an officer responded in the affirmative as if this were a totally normal occurrence.

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