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Kindergarteners were asked where they'd want to time travel and the answers are incredible

If you ever want to gain a whole new perspective on life, talk to a classroom full of 5-year-olds. Young kids approach the world with refreshing innocence and delightful wonder, and their perspective can teach us all some valuable lessons.

George Pointon often shares conversations he has with his year one students (the equivalent of kindergarten in the U.S.) on Twitter, with questions such as "What's the best thing that's ever happened to you?" or "What do adults do for fun? and they are always entertaining. The latest question he asked his students—"If you could time travel, where would you go?"—resulted in some hilariously meaningful answers. And Pointon's analysis of their answers makes them even funnier.

Alice answered, "to after school."

"Straight off to a belter here," Pointon wrote. "She could go anywhere. I mean literally wherever, whenever (said Shakira). But Alice has decided to use this omnipotence to move, 47 minutes into the future. I took it personally to be honest. My lessons aren't that bad."

Poor Mr. Pointon.


Katie had a similar answer, "So I can go to the park."

"There is a park literally outside the school, so, again, Katie also wants to use her power to travel 40 minutes ahead of time. I'm annoyed but I do appreciate and love the innocence of it. Why live more than today? Today is the best we have."

There's that out-of-the-mouths-of-babes wisdom we love to see. Live in the now. Don't yearn for a different time or another season. Be present in the present and make the most of it.

Of course, we all see things differently and Jack had a whole other approach to the question. "Back in time REALLY far."

By "REALLY far," Jack meant 1999. So he could do nothing but go swimming. Pointon is right—time travel is wasted on the young.

Unless we're talking about Toby's answer, which was "Meet my mum as a baby." Yes. Brilliant. Perfectly sweet film storyline that's probably already been done but who cares.

Or "selfless and kind" Emma, "Floremma Nightingale," who said she would "take medicine back to old times." Oh, my heart.

Pointon's threads like this often feature particularly funny responses from Mikey, who for this questions simply answered "Breakfast."

"Normally I use this platform to dismantle Mikey's answers," Pointon wrote. "Not today. He is staying at his Nana's and she made Chocolate Chip Pancakes this morning with a banana milkshake. I can only agree with him. Forgot seeing Plato or The Beatles. Nans pancakes please."

And just when you thought it was all sweet, light-hearted fun, Ravi chimed in with "See my Grandpa again." Cue the tears and grab the tissues, because he said they played marbles together. MARBLES. Oof.

Rosie brought us back, though, with "Go to the cinema to see Hotel Transylvania 2." Right on, Rosie. No home TV experience compares to going to the movies.

Wendy wouldn't because she doesn't want to. You do you, Wendy. Don't let anyone dim that independent spirit.

And Ben, who wants to "Go to New York with the dinosaurs"? Thank you for the reminder that 5-year-olds and dinosaurs are a timeless pair, even if New York didn't exist until millions of years after they were all dead.

And then, finally, there's Susanna, the disgruntled-but-honest older sister whose brother had to come along and ruin her young life by existing. Hope you work through that by second grade, Susanna.

Seriously, little kids are the best. I don't know how kindergarten teachers make it through the day without writing down every other hilarious or surprisingly deep thing their students say.

Thank you, Mr. Pointon, for sharing these gems with the world. (You can follow him on Twitter @GeorgePointon_ for more kid-inspired wisdom and fun.)

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