Prior studies have shown that cows use different moos to express different feelings. And it turns out, they go through a lot of different feelings when they're going through puberty.

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Five years ago, I unexpectedly found myself driving to New Jersey to pick up hermit crabs from a stranger.

Like many New Yorkers, I search Craigslist ads when I'm bored. I don't remember what I was looking for that day—it might have been a sodastream or mini trampoline. But what I found was a young woman who was moving away to college and wanted to find a home for her hermit crabs.

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A 2009 study found that dogs have the intelligence of a two-and-a-half-year-old child. They can also understand up to 250 words and gestures. And they've had a long time to get it right. We started domesticating dogs 10,000 to 15,000 years ago, and that domestication runs deep. It turns out, even dogs who have never heard a human yell "roll over" might still understand basic commands. A new study found that stray dogs can understand human gestures, such as pointing, which suggests that dogs innately understand people.

Dr. Anindita Bhadra of the Indian Institute of Science Education and Research Kolkata and her colleagues studied 160 stray dogs across several cities in India. Two covered bowls were placed in front of each dog. One bowl contained raw chicken, and the other bowl was both empty and food-scented.

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The other day, I came across this post on my Facebook page describing the way hermit crabs exchange shells. Never having given hermit crabs any thought, I almost passed it up, but the bold text "ALL EXCHANGE SHELLS IN SEQUENCE SO EVERYONE GETS A NEW HOME" caught my eye. Like, what?

I was astounded to find out that hermit crabs who need new, bigger shells will line up in a queue, biggest to smallest. When a crab that fits the largest empty shell shows up, the others all move up one shell, leaving the smallest shell empty at the end of the line.

Like, WHAT?!

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