The delicious tale of Popeye, a famous rescue pup now living in food paradise.

Popeye the pup is a furry 4-year-old living it up in Southern California.

All photos courtesy of ​Popeye the Foodie Dog/Instagram.

But things weren't always so bright and sunny for the little guy.


About three years ago, his human, Ivy Diep, spotted him wandering the streets alone — dirty, heavily matted, and skinny.

"He had just crossed a major street and I thought, 'Oh, I hope that pup's going to be okay,'" Diep wrote in an email. "I had returned home that day and was about to head out again when I saw him again across the street from my house."

This is what Popeye looked like when Diep first found him on the street.

Concerned for his safety, Diep called out to him.

"He actually came to me!" she said. "Some dogs would bolt, but he didn't."

Diep loved Popeye but was hesitant to welcome him to the family at first. After all, she already had a house full of pets; she wasn't looking for any more canine additions. But no one else would take him.

She decided it must be meant to be. And boy, was it a great decision.

Although Popeye can sometimes be "a loud barky monster to new people and dogs," Diep said, now he fits right in.

"It wasn't long before he made himself at home at my place with my other dogs," Diep told Bored Panda. "And of course, my husband and I fell in love [with him, too]."

Popeye, like many dogs, loved being out and about. So Diep began bringing him on lunch dates and documenting the fun.

Their foodie adventures are as adorable as they are delicious.

So adorable, in fact, that a friend of Diep's recommended she start Popeye's own Instagram account to share their lunch dates with the world.

Today, Popeye the Foodie Dog has over 131,000 followers on Instagram.

It's difficult to know what fans enjoy most — the mouth-watering food they get to scroll through, or Popeye's delightful little expressions.

"He has a lot of personality in his face," Diep said. "It's adorable to capture."

Don't worry, though — Popeye doesn't eat any of the human food that could harm him. The photos are mostly just for show.

"He'll get nibbles of anything that's safe," Diep explained. "I also carry a bag of treats for him, in case there's nothing he can have."

Mostly, though, Popeye just loves getting out there and seeing the world.

Sometimes he'll dress for the occasion, too. Like on St. Patrick's Day.

"Where's the green beer?" reads the caption on Popeye's Instagram. "Giant prawns with garlic butter sauce over rice for our St. Patrick's Day lunch."

When Popeye's itching to get a taste of some French crepes, he's got to look the part.

And when he's enjoying a plate of BBQ? Cowboy hats are mandatory.

Diep is so glad she saved Popeye from the streets that day three years ago. Who knows what would have happened to him otherwise?

Many dogs aren't so lucky. It's difficult to tally the exact numbers, but the ASPCA estimates roughly 7.6 million cats and dogs stay in shelters across the U.S. each year. That figure, of course, doesn't include the millions more that are living on the street, like Popeye had been.

Tragically, when they're not adopted or returned to their humans, many of these animals are euthanized. That's why helping rescue dogs (and cats) find forever homes is so crucial.

Diep certainly recommends welcoming a rescue if it's right for you and your family, but with one big disclaimer: You must practice patience.

"Although Popeye was pretty easy as he's a really mellow, chill dog," she noted. "He was not house-trained and had a lot of fears — loud noise or a stick of any kind."

"He used to bolt anytime he saw us lift a broom or duster, even chopsticks.  It made me wonder if he was possibly traumatized in his past," she said.  

"I don't know what he went through before us, but I'm just glad that he's learned to love and trust that we won't hurt him."  

As is the case with welcoming any new dog to the home, there have been a few bumps in the road. But the pros of accepting Popeye far outweigh the cons.

"All the work in house-training him and the property damage he caused was all worth it," Diep said.  

There are probably plenty of cats and dogs in your own area that could use a warm bed and four walls to call home.

Help dogs like Popeye find forever homes in your own community today.

Courtesy of Verizon
True

If someone were to say "video games" to you, what are the first words that come to mind? Whatever words you thought of (fun, exciting, etc.), we're willing to guess "healthy" or "mental health tool" didn't pop into your mind.

And yet… it turns out they are. Especially for Veterans.

How? Well, for one thing, video games — and virtual reality more generally — are also more accessible and less stigmatized to veterans than mental health treatment. In fact, some psychiatrists are using virtual reality systems for this reason to treat PTSD.

Secondly, video games allow people to socialize in new ways with people who share common interests and goals. And for Veterans, many of whom leave the military feeling isolated or lonely after they lose the daily camaraderie of their regiment, that socialization is critical to their mental health. It gives them a virtual group of friends to talk with, connect to, and relate to through shared goals and interests.

In addition, according to a 2018 study, since many video games simulate real-life situations they encountered during their service, it makes socialization easier since they can relate to and find common ground with other gamers while playing.

This can help ease symptoms of depression, anxiety, and even PTSD in Veterans, which affects 20% of the Veterans who have served since 9/11.

Watch here as Verizon dives into the stories of three Veteran gamers to learn how video games helped them build community, deal with trauma and have some fun.

Band of Gamers www.youtube.com

Video games have been especially beneficial to Veterans since the beginning of the pandemic when all of us — Veterans included — have been even more isolated than ever before.

And that's why Verizon launched a challenge last year, which saw $30,000 donated to four military charities.

And this year, they're going even bigger by launching a new World of Warships charity tournament in partnership with Wargaming and Wounded Warrior Project called "Verizon Warrior Series." During the tournament, gamers will be able to interact with the game's iconic ships in new and exciting ways, all while giving back.

Together with these nonprofits, the tournament will welcome teams all across the nation in order to raise money for military charities helping Veterans in need. There will be a $100,000 prize pool donated to these charities, as well as donation drives for injured Veterans at every match during the tournament to raise extra funds.

Verizon is also providing special discounts to Those Who Serve communities, including military and first responders, and they're offering a $75 in-game content military promo for World of Warships.

Tournament finals are scheduled for August 8, so be sure to tune in to the tournament and donate if you can in order to give back to Veterans in need.

Courtesy of Verizon

via CNN / Twitter

Eviction seemed imminent for Dasha Kelly, 32, and her three young daughters Sharron, 8; Kia, 6; and Imani, 5, on Monday. The eviction moratorium expired over the weekend and it looked like there was no way for them to avoid becoming homeless.

The former Las Vegas card dealer lost her job due to casino closures during the pandemic and needed $2,000 to cover her back rent. The mother of three couldn't bear the thought of being put out of her apartment with three children in the scorching Nevada desert.

"I had no idea what we were going to do," Kelly said, according to KOAT.

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