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Right after announcing he was taking a pay cut to raise employees' salaries, business is booming.

Here's a story to show your boss. When it comes to taking care of his employees, Gravity Payments CEO Dan Price is going above and beyond (and business has never been better).

Right after announcing he was taking a pay cut to raise employees' salaries, business is booming.

You might have heard a story from a few weeks ago about a CEO named Dan Price and his plan to raise the starting salary for his employees to $70,000 per year.

He told his employees about the change at Gravity Payments, his credit card processing company, during their quarterly staff meeting.


Needless to say, they were pretty excited about the news, giving him a standing ovation.

CBS News interviewed 29-year-old equipment supervisor Jose Garcia about the change. He said that he cried when he told his mom about the raise.

Before the announcement, Garcia's salary was $33,000 per year. The raise was a huge deal to him and others at the company.

Over the next two years, salaries will increase periodically.

Effective immediately, everyone in the company will make at least $50,000 (or, if they already make more than $50,000, they'll get a $5,000-per-year raise). From there, all employees will be bumped to $60,000 next year, and $70,000 the year after.

How is Price doing this? To start, he took a huge pay cut.

He had been making $1 million per year. But now? He'll take home just $70,000 per year.

Price was motivated to change the salary structure after reading a 2010 study that suggested people have the highest emotional well-being at $75,000.

Would raising the salary of someone like Jose Garcia from $33,000 to $70,000 have a tremendous impact on his happiness? Likely! Is it the same for someone already making well over $75,000 per year? According to this study, no.

Business has never been better.

Price tells CNN Money that in the 11 years he's been running Gravity Payments, he's never seen a better week for new business after bringing in dozens of new clients.

"In the short-term, [news reports about the pay] could help demand for our services, but clients won't stay with a company that's not providing a superior value."
— Dan Price

Morale is high, and applications are flying in faster than ever before.

It turns out that offering people a living wage with competitive benefits makes people want to work for you. Who knew?

They've received about 3,500 job applications for the company's two open positions (a sales representative and a support staffer), which is around 10 times as many as they're used to.

He's putting people before profits.

Based on that study, he realized that making less than ideal wages is emotionally taxing on a person. So if he's in a position to help make the world a better place for the people around him, why wouldn't he?

He cut the company's immediate profit projections in half, but he seems pretty happy with how that's working out so far.

After all, there's a reason Price was named 2014's "Entrepreneur of the Year" by Entrepreneur Magazine.

And it probably has to do with making gutsy decisions like this (and possibly looking ridiculously good in a blazer).

Check out the CBS News report about Price:

via USO

Army Capt. Justin Meredith used the Bob Hope Legacy Reading Program to read to his son and family while deployed in the Middle East.

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One of the biggest challenges deployed service members face is the feeling of being separated from their families, especially when they have children. It's also very stressful for children to be away from parents who are deployed for long periods of time.

For the past four years, the USO has brought deployed service members and their families closer through a wonderful program that allows them to read together. The Bob Hope Legacy Reading Program gives deployed service members the ability to choose a book, read it on camera, then send both the recording and book to their child.

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Cayce LaCorte explains why virginity doesn't exist.

The concept of virginity is a very loaded issue in American culture. If a woman loses hers when she's too young she can be slut-shamed. If a man remains a virgin for too long, he can be bullied for not being manly enough.

There is also a whole slew of religious mind games associated with virginity that can give people some serious psychological problems associated with sex.

Losing one's virginity has also been blown up way beyond proportion. It's often believed that it's a magical experience—it's usually not. Or that after having sex for the first time people can really start to enjoy living life—not the case.

What if we just dropped all of the stigmas surrounding virginity and instead, replaced them with healthy attitudes toward sex and relationships?

Writer Cayce LaCorte is going viral on TikTok for the simple way she's taught her five daughters to think about virginity. They don't have to. LaCorte shared her parenting ideas on TikTok in response to mom-influencer Nevada Shareef's question: "Name something about the way you raised your kids that people think is weird but you think is healthy."

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This article originally appeared on 08.15.18.


Have you ever wondered why people don't seem to say “you're welcome" anymore?

Back in 2015, author and professor Tom Nichols tweeted out an angry response after receiving what he thought was poor customer service:

“Dear Every Cashier in America: the proper response to 'thank you' is 'you're welcome,' not 'no problem.' And *you're* supposed to thank *me*"

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@bluffbakes on Tiktok

Chloe Sexton—baker, business owner, mother—knows all too well about "daddy privilege," that is, when men receive exorbitant amounts of praise for doing normal parental duties. You know, the ones that moms do without so much as a thank you.

In a lighthearted (while nonetheless biting) TikTok video, Chloe shares a "fun little story about 'daddy privilege'" that has now gone viral—no doubt due in part because working moms can relate to this on a deep, personal and infuriating level.

Chloe's TED Talks-worthy rant begins with:

"My husband has a job. I have a business, my husband has a job. Could not make that any clearer, right? Well, my bakery requires that we buy certain wholesale ingredients at this place called Restaurant Depot every week. You've seen me do videos of it before where I'm, like, wearing him or was massively pregnant buying 400 pounds of flour and 100 pounds of butter, and that's a weekly thing. The list goes on and on, like — it's a lot."
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