People are loving how these soccer fans trolled Russia using their countries' jerseys.

Russia has an abhorrent track record on LGBTQ rights.

While the country technically decriminalized homosexuality after the fall of the Soviet Union, Russia took a sharp turn right when President Vladimir Putin's 2013 legislation cracking down on "nontraditional" relationships went into effect. The intentionally vague law bans public demonstrations that aim to expand LGBTQ rights and it prohibits the distribution of LGBTQ-themed material to minors.

In other words, you won't see too many rainbow flags flying around Moscow.


An LGBTQ rights activist gets arrested by Russian police in 2013. Photo by Andrey Smirnov/AFP/Getty Images.

But Russia was in the midst of hosting the World Cup. And fans from across the globe flocked there to watch the matches — and some sent a striking political message while they were at it.

Six activists from six different countries trolled Russia with a clever display of rainbow colors.

Wearing the soccer jerseys of their native countries, activists from Spain, Holland, Brazil, Mexico, Argentina, and Colombia strolled around Russia discreetly flaunting LGBTQ pride and snapping pics along the way.

The Spanish activist (red), the Dutch activist (orange), the Brazilian activist (yellow), the Mexican activist (green), the Argentinian activist (blue), and the Colombian activist (purple). All photos by Javer Ties, courtesy of The Hidden Flag.

The project, dubbed The Hidden Flag, was launched by a Spanish organization called La Federación Estatal de Lesbianas, Gais, Transexuales, y Bisexuales (FELGTB).

The federation devised the The Hidden Flag project with help from creative agency LOLA MullenLowe and production company Primo Content.

FELGTB, whose name translates to the State Federation of Lesbians, Gays, Transexuals, and Bisexuals), claims to be Spain's largest LGBTQ rights organization. So it was only natural that it wanted to send a bold message to Russia and the rest of the world by "infiltrating the rainbow flag and defying the current [Russian] law."

Using the hashtag #TheHiddenFlag, people from around the world cheered on the demonstration.

One particularly viral tweet sharing pics of the effort amassed an incredible 270,000 likes, as of this writing.

The motivation behind the colorful photos, however, paints a dark reality.

Citing a study from the Center for Independent Social Research, FELGTB noted that hate crimes targeting the LGBTQ community have doubled since Russia's 2013 anti-gay law went into effect. What's more, Russia has allowed Chechnya — a semi-independent state within its jurisdiction — to enforce a "gay purge" targeting queer men with imprisonment, torture, and even death.

"Becoming visible is a huge risk in Russia," FELGTB President Uge Sangil said in a statement.

"But doing it in front of thousands of fans and reporters during the World Cup and with this smart and original protest is what really motivated us."

"The Hidden Flag gives visibility to ALL of the brave people who face discrimination, silencing, and fear on a daily basis in Russia and other parts of the world were LBGTI people are persecuted, humiliated or marginalized," Sangil continued.

Until every LGBTQ person is treated with respect and dignity — no matter where they happen to live — we have work to do.

Learn more about The Hidden Flag and the activists who brought it to life.

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When a pet is admitted to a shelter it can be a traumatizing experience. Many are afraid of their new surroundings and are far from comfortable showing off their unique personalities. The problem is that's when many of them have their photos taken to appear in online searches.

Chewy, the pet retailer who has dedicated themselves to supporting shelters and rescues throughout the country, recognized the important work of a couple in Tampa, FL who have been taking professional photos of shelter pets to help get them adopted.

"If it's a photo of a scared animal, most people, subconsciously or even consciously, are going to skip over it," pet photographer Adam Goldberg says. "They can't visualize that dog in their home."

Adam realized the importance of quality shelter photos while working as a social media specialist for the Humane Society of Broward County in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

"The photos were taken top-down so you couldn't see the size of the pet, and the flash would create these red eyes," he recalls. "Sometimes [volunteers] would shoot the photos through the chain-link fences."

That's why Adam and his wife, Mary, have spent much of their free time over the past five years photographing over 1,200 shelter animals to show off their unique personalities to potential adoptive families. The Goldbergs' wonderful work was recently profiled by Chewy in the video above entitled, "A Day in the Life of a Shelter Pet Photographer."

This article originally appeared on 12.02.19


Just imagine being an 11-year-old boy who's been shuffled through the foster care system. No forever home. No forever family. No idea where you'll be living or who will take care of you in the near future.

Then, a loving couple takes you under their care and chooses to love you forever.

What could one be more thankful for?

That's why when a fifth grader at Deerfield Elementary School in Cedar Hills, Utah was asked by his substitute teacher what he's thankful for this Thanksgiving, he said finally being adopted by his two dads.

via OD Action / Twitter

To the child's shock, the teacher replied, "that's nothing to be thankful for," and then went on a rant in front of 30 students saying that "two men living together is a sin" and "homosexuality is wrong."

While the boy sat there embarrassed, three girls in the class stood up for him by walking out of the room to tell the principal. Shortly after, the substitute was then escorted out of the building.

While on her way out she scolded the boy, saying it was his fault she was removed.

RELATED: A gay couple's pride flag helped give a young teen the courage to come out to their family

One of the boy's parents-to-be is Louis van Amstel, is a former dancer on ABC's "Dancing with the Stars." "It's absolutely ridiculous and horrible what she did," he told The Salt Lake Tribune. "We were livid. It's 2019 and this is a public school."

The boy told his parents-to-be he didn't speak up in the classroom because their final adoption hearing is December 19 and he didn't want to do anything that would interfere.

He had already been through two failed adoptions and didn't want it to happen again.

via Loren Javier / Flickr

A spokesperson for the Alpine School District didn't go into detail about the situation but praised the students who spoke out.

"Fellow students saw a need, and they were able to offer support," David Stephenson said. "It's awesome what happened as far as those girls coming forward."

RELATED: A homophobic ad was placed next to a pizza shop. They messed with the wrong place.

He also said that "appropriate action has been taken" with the substitute teacher.

"We are concerned about any reports of inappropriate behavior and take these matters very seriously," Kelly Services, the school the contracts out substitute teachers for the district, said in a statement. "We conduct business based on the highest standards of integrity, quality, and professional excellence. We're looking into this situation."

After the incident made the news, the soon-to-be adoptive parents' home was covered in paper hearts that said, "We love you" and "We support you."

Religion is supposed to make us better people.

But what have here is clearly a situation where a woman's judgement about what is good and right was clouded by bigoted dogma. She was more bothered by the idea of two men loving each other than the act of pure love they committed when choosing to adopt a child.