75 years later, D-Day veteran meets long-lost French love www.youtube.com


There are millions of love stories in the world, but occasionally one stands out—like this one.

Falling in love is a universal human phenomenon without a universal definition. It can be a slow-building fire or a flash in the pan. It can happen over years, or over a single cup of coffee. Sometimes it fizzles and fades, and sometimes it lingers for a lifetime.

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Andy Grammer's 'mom hug' with a stranger is a beautiful reminder that we're all connected.

Many people chimed in to share similar stories of cosmic connections with strangers and stories of spreading kindness and love in honor of loved ones who have passed.

Singer Andy Grammer had a special connection with his mom who died of cancer nine years ago.

Grammer's beloved mother, Kathy, passed away from breast cancer in 2009, when Grammer was 25. He has written several songs dedicated to her, and he shares the wisdom he gleaned from his mama in his hit single "Give Love." Her death was an unexpected blow, and Grammer has talked openly about the difficult journey of coming to terms with her passing.

Years after her death, Grammer and his mom still share a special connection — one that made itself known while he was eating breakfast at a restaurant in Hampton Beach, New Hampshire.

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Chloe Dykstra has spoken out about the painful reality of being in an abusive relationship.

In a post on Medium in June 2018, beloved gamer, actress, model, and cosplayer Dykstra wrote about the harrowing experience of being in a long-term abusive relationship.

"One day, I met someone at a convention and ended up falling for a man almost 20 years my senior," Dykstra wrote. "It wasn't the first time I'd found myself in a relationship with an older man; I've always joked about my daddy issues, and thought that with age came stability and wisdom. Welp."

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"How do you bear it? That must be devastating," a colleague said. I'd mentioned that my husband is quadriplegic.

With a familiar tightness in my chest, I answer the same tired question: "It's not. We do just fine." "He lived alone long before I met him," I wanted to say, "and he's a theater professor" — and lots of things that I knew would only sound defensive.

The coworker read my near silence as an admission (of what, I'm never sure. Sexlessness? Solitude? Nights spent gripping a bottle of gin?) and said earnestly, "I'm so sorry you have to go through that every day. I can't even imagine."

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