A café got a one-star review for its food but its response was five stars.
via Trip Advisor

For business owners, reviews on social media platforms such as Yelp!, Google or TripAdvisor are both a blessing and a curse.

They provide amazing social proof for prospective customers that show you're providing a great service, tasty food or manufacture high-quality products.

However, online reviewers can be picky or downright dishonest. Getting a negative review taken down on most of these social media platforms is difficult and in some instances impossible. One bad review can turn off countless potential customers costing business owners countless dollars.

A cafe owner in Stockport, England, a city just south of Manchester, fought back against a one-star review with a dash of humor and self-deprecation and it brought his business a ton of attention.

It all started with a TripAdvisor review knocking the Nook Neighbourhood Café for its "tepid" and "undercooked" porridge. The customer claims to have asked for three servings before eventually giving up.

(For the uninitiated, porridge is a hot breakfast cereal made from starchy grains similar to oatmeal.)



via Trip Advisor

"The lady's comment was quite disappointing because we try to provide the best service at all times," Arlo Calderbank, the café's manager, told Manchester Evening News. "Seeing the comment pop up on TripAdvisor was a bit of a shame."

He was also miffed because the review was dishonest.

"I was working when the lady complained," he continued. "I remember her face. She wasn't particularly happy, she had a bit of a grumble and we gave her a refund. The next thing there was a nasty comment left on TripAdvisor."

So Calderbank decided to turn cold porridge into gold by creating a funny street sign that references the review in a tongue-and-cheek manner. "Come in & try the worst porridge that one woman on TripAdvisor had in her life."

A passersby took a photo of the sign and posted it to Instagram and it quickly went viral. Calderbank and his fellow employees were shocked by the public's reaction.

"I'm gobsmacked about the amount of shares and reaction the sign has had on social media," he said. "I do like the little quirky drawings the staff sometimes do, but so far this one has beaten them all for reaction. All the staff are gobsmacked about it too."

The post got some funny responses as well.

via Justinmoorhouse / Instagram

Even though his café got slammed on TripAdvisor, Calderbank still belives that online feedback is valuable for the business. "I check what's being said on there every day," he said. "We do genuinely take all comments seriously. It's really useful to see what the customers have been saying and to take on board feedback."

Running a business means dealing with the public, which can be tricky, especially in the age of social media. But great customer service is all about knowing that bad things are bound to happen and knowing how to handle them the best way possible.

And for that, Calderbank deserves "5 stars — will recommend."

From Your Site Articles
Related Articles Around the Web
Photo by Louis Hansel on Unsplash
True

This story was originally shared on Capital One.

Inside the walls of her kitchen at her childhood home in Guatemala, Evelyn Klohr, the founder of a Washington, D.C.-area bakery called Kakeshionista, was taught a lesson that remains central to her business operations today.

"Baking cakes gave me the confidence to believe in my own brand and now I put my heart into giving my customers something they'll enjoy eating," Klohr said.

While driven to launch her own baking business, pursuing a dream in the culinary arts was economically challenging for Klohr. In the United States, culinary schools can open doors to future careers, but the cost of entry can be upwards of $36,000 a year.

Through a friend, Klohr learned about La Cocina VA, a nonprofit dedicated to providing job training and entrepreneurship development services at a training facility in the Washington, D.C-area.

La Cocina VA's, which translates to "the kitchen" in Spanish, offers its Bilingual Culinary Training program to prepare low-and moderate-income individuals from diverse backgrounds to launch careers in the food industry.

That program gave Klohr the ability to fully immerse herself in the baking industry within a professional kitchen facility and receive training in an array of subjects including culinary skills, food safety, career development and English language classes.

Keep Reading Show less

The year 2018 was a pivotal one in the produce industry, the Red Delicious was supplanted as the most popular apple in America by the sweeter, crisper Gala.

It was only a matter of time. The Red Delicious looked the part of the king of the apples with its deep red, flawless skin. But its interior was soft, mealy, and pretty bland. The Red Delicious was popular for growers because its skin hid any bruises and it was desired by consumers because of its appearance.

But these days it's having a hard time competing with the delectable crunch provided by the Gala, honeycrisp, and Fuji.

Keep Reading Show less
True

When a pet is admitted to a shelter it can be a traumatizing experience. Many are afraid of their new surroundings and are far from comfortable showing off their unique personalities. The problem is that's when many of them have their photos taken to appear in online searches.

Chewy, the pet retailer who has dedicated themselves to supporting shelters and rescues throughout the country, recognized the important work of a couple in Tampa, FL who have been taking professional photos of shelter pets to help get them adopted.

"If it's a photo of a scared animal, most people, subconsciously or even consciously, are going to skip over it," pet photographer Adam Goldberg says. "They can't visualize that dog in their home."

Adam realized the importance of quality shelter photos while working as a social media specialist for the Humane Society of Broward County in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

"The photos were taken top-down so you couldn't see the size of the pet, and the flash would create these red eyes," he recalls. "Sometimes [volunteers] would shoot the photos through the chain-link fences."

That's why Adam and his wife, Mary, have spent much of their free time over the past five years photographing over 1,200 shelter animals to show off their unique personalities to potential adoptive families. The Goldbergs' wonderful work was recently profiled by Chewy in the video above entitled, "A Day in the Life of a Shelter Pet Photographer."