The story of the NRA's ridiculous boycott of a Dallas diner has a happy ending.

The National Rifle Association called for a boycott of a Dallas diner. It backfired spectacularly.

With the NRA coming to town for its annual meeting in May 2018, Dallas restaurant Ellen's printed a special message on the bottom of its receipts. It read:

"Thanks for visiting Ellen's! A portion of this week's proceeds will be donated to organizations dedicated to implementing reasonable and effective gun regulations. Welcome to Dallas!"

What a day this has been! We want to give some clarification to an issue that has caused quite a bit of confusion and...


Posted by Ellen's on Friday, May 4, 2018

After a bit of confusion over what the restaurant meant, they later added "that protect citizens' 2nd Amendment rights and also help reduce needless gun violence" to the end of the message. They published a Facebook post apologizing for confusion, but by then, it was too late.

The NRA had already published a tweet containing a copy of the original version of the receipt, urging its members to "steer clear" of the restaurant as well as to "#StandAndFight," calling on convention attendees to boycott.

Now, there's nothing wrong with boycotts. People are more than welcome to decide where they want to spend their money. It's just a little ironic given that the NRA's response to people calling for boycotts of NRA-affiliated companies was to call the ordeal a "a shameful display of political and civic cowardice."

In addition, NRA spokesperson Dana Loesch has regularly tweeted about how she doesn't believe in boycotts and wouldn't call for one, once writing, "I hate boycotts." Again, though, that's exactly what the group's "steer clear" message was encouraging: a boycott.

As soon as the NRA's tweet went up, Ellen's said it began receiving a flood of hateful calls and reviews from NRA supporters.

In a video for Now This News, Ellen's co-owner Joe Groves recalled the immediate aftermath of the NRA's tweet.

"We were being told that we were being shot up, to expect a bomb at any time, that they would be visiting but they don't want to be there when the explosion happens. Our staff has been harassed," he said.

Thankfully, no one followed through on the violent threats. Instead, NRA supporters apparently tried to mess with the restaurant's online booking system by filling it with fake reservations so it couldn't take actual reservations and leaving a bunch of one-star reviews on Facebook and Yelp. Boycotters also did the same to an unaffiliated Houston-area restaurant of the same name, causing the restaurant to decide to rebrand entirely.

NRA spokesperson Dana Loesch speaks at the group's annual meeting on May 4. Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images.

Luckily, this story has a happy ending for the Dallas restaurant and people who support reasonable gun safety regulations.

Thanks in part to the added publicity directed its way by the NRA's boycott, Ellen's had an extremely busy weekend, bringing in more money than usual. In the end, $15,000 was raised for charity, to be donated to gun safety group Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America.

It's disturbing that the NRA sees the words "reasonable and effective" and immediately urges its members to "#StandAndFight," but it seems that's the world we live in.

As the convention came to an end, the restaurant updated its receipts one final time with a message we should all be able to get behind: "Love one another. Protect the vulnerable. Find common ground. Say 'yes' to peace."

As the NRA convention adjourns in Dallas and its attendees make their ways back home, we wish them all safe and easy...

Posted by Ellen's on Sunday, May 6, 2018
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When a pet is admitted to a shelter it can be a traumatizing experience. Many are afraid of their new surroundings and are far from comfortable showing off their unique personalities. The problem is that's when many of them have their photos taken to appear in online searches.

Chewy, the pet retailer who has dedicated themselves to supporting shelters and rescues throughout the country, recognized the important work of a couple in Tampa, FL who have been taking professional photos of shelter pets to help get them adopted.

"If it's a photo of a scared animal, most people, subconsciously or even consciously, are going to skip over it," pet photographer Adam Goldberg says. "They can't visualize that dog in their home."

Adam realized the importance of quality shelter photos while working as a social media specialist for the Humane Society of Broward County in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

"The photos were taken top-down so you couldn't see the size of the pet, and the flash would create these red eyes," he recalls. "Sometimes [volunteers] would shoot the photos through the chain-link fences."

That's why Adam and his wife, Mary, have spent much of their free time over the past five years photographing over 1,200 shelter animals to show off their unique personalities to potential adoptive families. The Goldbergs' wonderful work was recently profiled by Chewy in the video above entitled, "A Day in the Life of a Shelter Pet Photographer."

Vanna White appeared on "The Price Is Right" in 1980.

Vanna White has been a household name in the United States for decades, which is kind of hilarious when you consider how she gained her fame and fortune. Since 1982, the former model and actress has made millions walking back and forth turning letters (and later simply touching them—yay technology) on the game show "Wheel of Fortune."

That's it. Walking back and forth in a pretty evening gown, flipping letters and clapping for contestants. More on that job in a minute…

As a member of Gen X, television game shows like "Wheel of Fortune" and "The Price is Right" send me straight back to my childhood. Watching this clip from 1980 of Vanna White competing on "The Price is Right" two years before she started turning letters on "Wheel of Fortune" is like stepping into a time machine. Bob Barker's voice, the theme music, the sound effects—I swear I'm home from school sick, lying on the ugly flowered couch with my mom checking my forehead and bringing me Tang.

This video has it all: the early '80s hairstyles, a fresh-faced Vanna White and Bob Barker's casual sexism that would never in a million years fly today.

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