Chanel Miller, woman sexually assaulted by Brock Turner, reveals herself in new book that'll 'change the culture'
Viking / Mariah Tiffany

The Brock Turner rape case was at the infection point of a series of social issues that now dominate today's headlines. It was the beginning of real discussions on white male privilege and sexual assault on college campuses, and helped inspire the #MeToo movement.

In 2016, Turner was found guilty of three counts of felony sexual assault for raping an unconscious woman behind a dumpster outside a fraternity house at Stanford University.

To protect her identity, she was referred to as "Emily Doe" in court proceedings, or "unconscious intoxicated woman" by the media.


Turner faced 14 years in prison, but the college swimmer only received six months from Judge Aaron Persky who said "a prison sentence would have a severe impact on him, I think he will not be a danger to others." As if prison time wouldn't have a "severe impact" on just about anyone.

It was widely presumed that Turner's lenient sentence was the result of white male privilege, resulting in voters recalling Persky from his position in 2018.

During the trial, "Emily Doe" wrote a powerful 12-page impact statement that revealed how the rape and its investigation upended her life.

"My life has been on hold for over a year, a year of anger, anguish and uncertainty, until a jury of my peers rendered a judgment that validated the injustices I had endured," she wrote.

RELATED: Brock Turner is now the textbook definition of the word 'rape'

She included painful details about how her body was handled by investigators.

"I had multiple swabs inserted into my vagina and anus, needles for shots, pills, had a Nikon pointed right into my spread legs. I had long, pointed beaks inside me and had my vagina smeared with cold, blue paint to check for abrasions," she wrote.

While taking a shower in the hospital, she felt terrified of her own body.

"I don't want my body anymore," she continued. "I was terrified of it. I didn't know what had been in it, if it had been contaminated, who had touched it. I wanted to take off my body like a jacket and leave it at the hospital with everything else."

It's been over four years since the brutal rape and "Emily Doe" is ready to show the world that the strong woman behind the impact statement is Chanel Miller.

But she has a lot more to say. Miller's story was purchased by Viking and will be told in her upcoming memoir, "Know My Name."

"Her story illuminates a culture biased to protect perpetrators, indicts a criminal justice system designed to fail the most vulnerable, and, ultimately, shines with the courage required to move through suffering and live a full and beautiful life," the publisher describes her book.

"It was just obvious to me from the beginning what she had to say and how different it was and how extraordinarily well she was going to say it," Miller's editor, Andrea Schulz, told The New York Times. "She had the brain and the voice of a writer from the very beginning, even in that situation."

RELATED: The judge who sentenced Brock Turner to 6 months in jail has been recalled

The cover of the book is inspired by the Japanese art of kintsugi or "golden repair" where broken pottery is mended together by gold lacquer into something beautiful and new. Kintsugi artists treat breakage and repair as part of the history of an object, rather than something they're trying to hide.

"It is one of the most important books that I've ever published," Schulz continued, because of its ability to "change the culture that we live in and the assumptions we make about what survivors should be expected to go through to get justice."

"Know My Name" will be released on September 24.

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Often, parents of children with special needs struggle to find Halloween costumes that will accommodate medical equipment or provide a proper fit. And figuring out how to make one? Yikes.

There's good news; shopDisney has added new ensembles to their already impressive line of adaptive play costumes. And from 8/30 - 9/26, there's a 20% off sale for all costume and costume accessory orders of $75+ with code Spooky.

When looking for the right costume, kids with unique needs have a lot of extra factors to consider: wheelchair wheels get tangled up in too-long material, feeding tubes could get twisted the wrong way, and children with sensory processing disorders struggle with the wrong kind of fabric, seams, or tags. There are a lot of different obstacles that can come between a kid and the ability to wear the costume of their choice, which is why it's so awesome that more and more companies are recognizing the need for inclusive creations that make it easy for everyone to enjoy the magic of make-believe.

Created with inclusivity in mind, the adaptive line is designed to discreetly accommodate tubes or wires from the front or the back, with lots of stretch, extra length and roomier cut, and self-stick fabric closures to make getting dressed hassle-free. The online shop provides details on sizing and breaks down the magical elements of each outfit and accessory, taking the guesswork out of selecting the perfect costume for the whole family.

Your child will be able to defeat Emperor Zurg in comfort with the Buzz Lightyear costume featuring a discreet flap opening at the front for easy tube access, with self-stick fabric closure. There is also an opening at the rear for wheelchair-friendly wear, and longer-length inseams to accommodate seated guests. To infinity and beyond!

An added bonus: many of the costumes offer a coordinating wheelchair cover set to add a major boost of fun. Kids can give their ride a total makeover—all covers are made to fit standard size chairs with 24" wheels—to transform it into anything from The Mandalorian's Razor Crest ship to Cinderella's Coach. Some options even come equipped with sounds and lights!

From babies to adults and adaptive to the group, shopDisney's expansive variety of Halloween costumes and accessories are inclusive of all.

Don't forget about your furry companions! Everyone loves to see a costumed pet trotting around, regardless of the occasion. You can literally dress your four-legged friend to look like Sven from Frozen, which might not sound like something you need in your life but...you totally do. CUTENESS OVERLOAD.

This year has been tough for everyone, so when a child gets that look of unfettered joy that comes from finally getting to wear the costume of their dreams, it's extra rewarding. Don't wait until the last minute to start looking for the right ensemble!


*Upworthy may earn a portion of sales revenue from purchases made through affiliate links on our site.

Those of us raising teenagers now didn't grow up with social media. Heck, the vast majority of us didn't even grow up with the internet. But we know how ubiquitous social media, with all of its psychological pitfalls, has become in our own lives, so it's not a big stretch to imagine the incredible impact it can have on our kids during their most self-conscious phase.

Sharing our lives on social media often means sharing the highlights. That's not bad in and of itself, but when all people are seeing is everyone else's highlight reels, it's easy to fall into unhealthy comparisons. As parents, we need to remind our teens not to do that—but we also need to remind them that other people will do that, which is why kindness, empathy, and inclusiveness are so important.

Writer and mother of three teen daughters, Whitney Fleming, shared a beautiful post on Facebook explaining what we need to teach our teenagers about empathy in the age of social media, and how we ourselves can serve as an example.

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