Hugh Jackman is an awesome dude.

He can sing. He can dance. He can act. He can even slay villains with one hand. 

GIF from "X-Men Origins: Wolverine."


One might say he's a "jackman of all trades." OK, no one will say that, but they should.

But unfortunately, skin cancer doesn't care if you're awesome.

Jackman announced on his Facebook page this week that he had a basal cell carcinoma, a type of skin cancer, removed from his nose. 

This is Jackman's fifth run-in with skin cancer in less than three years.

In November, 2013, Jackman's wife, actress Deborra-Lee Furness, noticed a small mark on his nose and pushed him to go to the doctor. Her intuition was right, and Jackman had a small carcinoma removed. 

Since then, Jackman has had four more basal cell carcinomas removed, including the latest this week. The 47-year-old actor has always been very public about his diagnoses and treatment, often encouraging fans to get checked and wear sunscreen. 

While scary, Jackman's form of skin cancer is rarely fatal.

Basal cell carcinoma is the most common type of skin cancer, with more than 3.3 million people diagnosed in the U.S. each year. 

A dermatologist uses an iPhone as a dermatoscope to examine a patient for symptoms of skin cancer. Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images.

Despite its frequency, this type of cancer isn't usually life-threatening, as basal cell carcinoma rarely spreads beyond the lesion site. However, it should be taken seriously as it can cause disfigurement.

But the good news for Jackman, and all of us, is that prevention is not only possible, it's easy.

1 in 5 Americans will develop skin cancer in their lifetime. And while many skin cancers are treatable, it's still wise to prevent them in the first place. 

Allow Mr. Jackman (in GIF form anyway) to walk you through three easy things you can do to protect yourself from ultraviolet (UV) rays, one of the primary causes of skin cancer. 

GIF via "The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon."

1. You've heard it before, but it bears repeating: Wear sunscreen.

And do it year-round. While most sunscreens don't filter out 100% of harmful radiation, they still do a great job of protecting your body's largest organ — your skin. So slather it on and re-apply if you swim or get sweaty. 

GIF from "X-Men Origins: Wolverine."

2. In addition to sunblock, wear some protective clothing.

Since sunscreen doesn't provide full protection from UV rays, it's important to supplement your skincare routine with clothes and garments that provide additional coverage. Cover up with dark, tightly-woven fabrics on your arms and legs. It may not be the cool, effortless beach look you were going for, but your skin will thank you. 

And don't forget a hat and sunglasses. Your face needs love too. 

GIF via "The Fountain"

3. Whatever you do, avoid tanning beds.

The UV light used in tanning beds is the same type of light you should be protecting yourself against when you're outdoors. If you're looking for a shot of color, head to your drug store's bronzer aisle. 

GIF from "Australia."

And one more tip, just for good measure. 

Don't be afraid to get up close and personal with your skin.

No one knows your skin like you, so give it a thorough once over on the regular. Use a mirror and really get in there. Be on the lookout for any changes to existing freckles, birthmarks, or moles. And, of course, if you develop any skin growths, let your doctor know. 

With regular checks you'll be the first to notice any changes. 

GIF from "Someone Like You."

Now have fun, be safe, and take care of yourself. Hugh would want you to.

That first car is a rite of passage into adulthood. Specifically, the hard-earned lesson of expectations versus reality. Though some of us are blessed with Teslas at 17, most teenagers receive a car that’s been … let’s say previously loved. And that’s probably a good thing, considering nearly half of first-year drivers end up in wrecks. Might as well get the dings on the lemon, right?

Of course, wrecks aside, buying a used car might end up costing more in the long run after needing repairs, breaking down and just a general slew of unexpected surprises. But hey, at least we can all look back and laugh.

My first car, for example, was a hand-me-down Toyota of some sort from my mother. I don’t recall the specific model, but I definitely remember getting into a fender bender within the first week of having it. She had forgotten to get the brakes fixed … isn’t that a fun story?

Jimmy Fallon recently asked his “Tonight Show” audience on Twitter to share their own worst car experiences. Some of them make my brake fiasco look like cakewalk (or cakedrive, in this case). Either way, these responses might make us all feel a little less alone. Or at the very least, give us a chuckle.

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Summer Clayton is the father of 2.4 million kids and he couldn’t be more proud.

Come for the food, stay for the wholesomeness.

Summer Clayton is the father of 2.4 million kids and he couldn’t be more proud. His TikTok channel is dedicated to giving people intimate conversations they might long to have with their own father, but can’t. The most popular is his “Dinner With Dad” segment.

The concept is simple: Clayton, aka Dad, always sets down two plates of food. He always tells you what’s for dinner. He always blesses the food. He always checks in with how you’re doing.

I stress the stability here, because as someone who grew up with a less-than-stable relationship with their parents, it stood out immediately. I found myself breathing a sigh of relief at Clayton’s consistency. I also noticed the immediate emotional connection created just by being asked, “How was your day?” According to relationship coach and couples counselor Don Olund, these two elements—stability and connection—are fundamental cravings that children have of their parents. Perhaps we never really stop needing it from them.


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How do you explain the transition from the brown and orange aesthetic of the '70s to the dusty rose and forest green carpeting of the '80s if you didn't experience it? When I tell my kids there were smoking sections in restaurants and airplanes and ashtrays everywhere, they look horrified (and rightfully so—what were we thinking?!). The fact that we went places with our friends with no quick way to get ahold of our parents? Unbelievable.

One day I described the process of listening to the radio, waiting for my favorite song to come on so I could record it on my tape recorder, and how mad I would get when the deejay talked through the intro of the song until the lyrics started. My Spotify-spoiled kids didn't even understand half of the words I said.

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