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I'm not saying Star Wars' John Boyega is the sweetest human being who ever walked the Earth...

...but he did just spend Friday delivering toys to Star Wars-obsessed kids in a London children's hospital dressed as Finn.


Thankfully, an image of the single most touching moment from Boyega's visit made its way to his Instagram for us all to witness.

Courtesy of the man himself and a little girl named Layla, who put on her Rey costume for the event:


❤️ Layla: Finn where's Rey? Finn: I don't know, I got beat by kylo and I can't remember anything Layla: okay I'll be your Rey today. Okay? Finn: okay! Lead the way.
A photo posted by @john_boyega on

"Where's Rey?" Layla reportedly asked Boyega. "I don't know, I got beat by Kylo [Ren] and I can't remember anything," Boyega replied.

"OK, I'll be your Rey today," the girl said.

"OK, lead the way!" Boyega told her.

After the release of "Star Wars: The Force Awakens," a lot of people were wondering "Where's Rey?"


Even though Rey is, arguably, the film's primary hero, many fans reported having difficulty finding Rey action figures and other merchandise in stores the weeks after the movie opened — in part because Lucasfilm underestimated her popularity and didn't anticipate how quickly Rey toys would fly off the shelves. Hasbro, in particular, came under fire for excluding the character from their Star Wars Monopoly game.

It took lots of people (including director J.J. Abrams) speaking out to get the toy companies to reverse course. Hasbro, ultimately, did include the character in a subsequent Monopoly release, though the company maintains that was its plan all along.

But the incident sent an unfortunate message to Star Wars fans: Women don't matter.

There's evidence that films featuring prominent female heroes can have a direct, positive impact on women's lives.

A 2016 survey of women in nine countries conducted by the Geena Davis Institute on Gender in Media and the J. Walter Thompson Company found that 61% of those contacted said that "female role models in film and TV have been influential in their lives," and 58% claimed that having those role models inspired them to be "more ambitious or assertive."

Acknowledging that women can run the show not only on screen but also on toy shelves and in conversations is critical to counteracting the message that heroism is a "no girls allowed" club.

That's why Boyega (as Finn) deserves to be applauded for making sure at least one little girl knows exactly where Rey is: in the lead.

GIF from "Star Wars: The Force Awakens."

A breastfeeding mother's experience at Vienna's Schoenbrunn Zoo is touching people's hearts—but not without a fair amount of controversy.

Gemma Copeland shared her story on Facebook, which was then picked up by the Facebook page Boobie Babies. Photos show the mom breastfeeding her baby next to the window of the zoo's orangutan habitat, with a female orangutan sitting close to the glass, gazing at them.

"Today I got feeding support from the most unlikely of places, the most surreal moment of my life that had me in tears," Copeland wrote.

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RumorGuard by The News Literacy Project.

The 2016 election was a watershed moment when misinformation online became a serious problem and had enormous consequences. Even though social media sites have tried to slow the spread of misleading information, it doesn’t show any signs of letting up.

A NewsGuard report from 2020 found that engagement with unreliable sites between 2019 and 2020 doubled over that time period. But we don’t need studies to show that misinformation is a huge problem. The fact that COVID-19 misinformation was such a hindrance to stopping the virus and one-third of American voters believe that the 2020 election was stolen is proof enough.

What’s worse is that according to Pew Research, only 26% of American adults are able to distinguish between fact and opinion.

To help teach Americans how to discern real news from fake news, The News Literacy Project has created a new website called RumorGuard that debunks questionable news stories and teaches people how to become more news literate.

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Family

A mom describes her tween son's brain. It's a must-read for all parents.

"Sometimes I just feel really angry and I don’t know why."

This story originally appeared on 1.05.19


It started with a simple, sincere question from a mother of an 11-year-old boy.

An anonymous mother posted a question to Quora, a website where people can ask questions and other people can answer them. This mother wrote:

How do I tell my wonderful 11 year old son, (in a way that won't tear him down), that the way he has started talking to me (disrespectfully) makes me not want to be around him (I've already told him the bad attitude is unacceptable)?

It's a familiar scenario for those of us who have raised kids into the teen years. Our sweet, snuggly little kids turn into moody middle schoolers seemingly overnight, and sometimes we're left reeling trying to figure out how to handle their sensitive-yet-insensitive selves.


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