Jameela Jamil wants women to stop apologizing for 'being ambitious'

A Time magazine survey found that only 38% of women called themselves "very" or "extremely" ambitious, while 51% of men described themselves that way. It's not that women aren't ambitious, it's that women are less likely to own their ambitions. On top of that, many women are actively discouraged as soon as they show signs of wanting more than what they've been assigned to. But "The Good Place" actress and activist Jameela Jamil is not going to be one of those people who thinks you should say "sorry" anytime you dare to dream.

Jamil posted a photo taken at a Comic Con panel with an inspirational message that you might want to keep on hand the next time you're waffling about going for the gold.


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"TRYING IS WINNING. You're a hero for taking a chance on yourself whatever happens. And most people will be forever haunted by the words 'what if?' Don't be that person. Please just go for whatever it is that you love, if you have the slightest opportunity to. Rejection still means you were a legend for risking your pride being hurt; to put yourself out there. That takes SO much character. I've failed a million times, and I consider those as noble as my few big wins," Jamil wrote in her inspirational post.

Women say, "I'm sorry," way too much. We'd even apologize to a lamp because we walked into it. Saying "I'm sorry" is tantamount to saying "I messed up" but the thing is, you're not messing up when you admit you want more out of life.

Jamil called on women to stop apologizing for having personal goals, especially if those goals conflict with the so-called status quo. "Do not apologize for being ambitious and thinking outside the box you have been forced into by the people around you, or by society's stereotypes of your people. Rage against the machine and do not conform. Do not behave. Do not surround yourself with nay-sayers. No more 'can't.' No more 'shouldn't.' You can't win a game if you don't play. I'm not saying I'm the pinnacle of success. I'm just doing more than I was ever told I could. And I'm happy with that," Jamil continued.

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Jamil ended her post with #womendontbragenough; now can we please get the hashtag #womanbrag trending? Women have accomplished a lot, and we should be able to shout it from the rooftops without having to qualify it with, "I mean, it's dumb or whatever, never mind."

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If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.