Why I'm loving that John Kerry and Leonardo DiCaprio hung out in Paris together.
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League of Conservation Voters

I am all about the budding bromance between Leonardo DiCaprio and Secretary of State John Kerry.

The unlikely (but awesome) duo met in Paris this week to chat about ... well, the future of humanity.

Climate change, that is.


How much do you want to be one of those glasses of water right now?

Kerry shared the photo on Twitter after the two of them met up at COP21 to further combat global carbon emissions.

If you haven't heard, world leaders are gathered in France this very moment at the UN's climate summit, COP21, trying to solidify a global game plan to halt global warming.

And seriously, it's truly a global affair. With officials from more than 150 countries agreeing to take part, COP21 is the largest gathering of heads of state ever.


Seeing as the conference is still in its final stages of negotiations on a global climate deal, it's too soon to know how effective the summit will be. But judging from the ambitious goals put forth and the encouraging cooperation among the world's largest carbon emitters, it's easy to see why environmentalists are hopeful COP21 will be a turning point.

DiCaprio and Kerry must be feeling good about the progress taking place in Paris, too.

Because just days ago, the A-list activist — who is also a UN Messenger of Peace for the climaterallied about 1,000 mayors to commit to transitioning their communities to be entirely powered by renewable energy in the coming decades, including an 80% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions by 2050.


Major cities from around the world — such as Vancouver, Sydney, and Copenhagen — as well as in the U.S. — like San Diego and Las Vegas — are jumping on board.

"To all the mayors and governors in this room today, I implore you to join with your peers to commit to moving to no less than 100% renewable energy as soon as possible," DiCaprio told leaders. "Do not wait another day.”

Kerry hasn't pulled any punches when it comes to the talks in Paris, either. He's in favor of a "legally binding transparency system" to hold participants accountable after deals are reached, and he has boldly called out climate-change doubters for blocking progress.

“I know there are still a few who insist that climate change is one big hoax, even a political conspiracy. These people are so out of touch with science that they believe rising sea levels don’t matter, because in their view the extra water is going to just spill over the sides of a flat earth. They’re wrong, obviously.

For those who may still question the 97% of peer-reviewed studies on climate change, let me just underscore: You don’t need to be a scientist to know that the earth is round, that the sun rises in the east and sets in the west, and that gravity is the reason that objects fall to the ground.”

— John Kerry, to The New York Times



We don't know exactly what Kerry and DiCaprio chatted about in Paris yet (again, what I'd give to be one of those glasses of water)...

But I imagine the conversation topic would have put a smile on the face of anyone even a tad bit concerned about the future of our planet — and humanity.

If that's you, you can do something this very second to support a renewable energy future. Sign this petition by the League of Conservation Voters to throw your weight behind the EPA's Clean Power Plan. (If not for the sake of humanity, because you know it'd make DiCaprio proud.)

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