Why I'm loving that John Kerry and Leonardo DiCaprio hung out in Paris together.
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League of Conservation Voters

I am all about the budding bromance between Leonardo DiCaprio and Secretary of State John Kerry.

The unlikely (but awesome) duo met in Paris this week to chat about ... well, the future of humanity.

Climate change, that is.


How much do you want to be one of those glasses of water right now?

Kerry shared the photo on Twitter after the two of them met up at COP21 to further combat global carbon emissions.

If you haven't heard, world leaders are gathered in France this very moment at the UN's climate summit, COP21, trying to solidify a global game plan to halt global warming.

And seriously, it's truly a global affair. With officials from more than 150 countries agreeing to take part, COP21 is the largest gathering of heads of state ever.


Seeing as the conference is still in its final stages of negotiations on a global climate deal, it's too soon to know how effective the summit will be. But judging from the ambitious goals put forth and the encouraging cooperation among the world's largest carbon emitters, it's easy to see why environmentalists are hopeful COP21 will be a turning point.

DiCaprio and Kerry must be feeling good about the progress taking place in Paris, too.

Because just days ago, the A-list activist — who is also a UN Messenger of Peace for the climaterallied about 1,000 mayors to commit to transitioning their communities to be entirely powered by renewable energy in the coming decades, including an 80% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions by 2050.


Major cities from around the world — such as Vancouver, Sydney, and Copenhagen — as well as in the U.S. — like San Diego and Las Vegas — are jumping on board.

"To all the mayors and governors in this room today, I implore you to join with your peers to commit to moving to no less than 100% renewable energy as soon as possible," DiCaprio told leaders. "Do not wait another day.”

Kerry hasn't pulled any punches when it comes to the talks in Paris, either. He's in favor of a "legally binding transparency system" to hold participants accountable after deals are reached, and he has boldly called out climate-change doubters for blocking progress.

“I know there are still a few who insist that climate change is one big hoax, even a political conspiracy. These people are so out of touch with science that they believe rising sea levels don’t matter, because in their view the extra water is going to just spill over the sides of a flat earth. They’re wrong, obviously.

For those who may still question the 97% of peer-reviewed studies on climate change, let me just underscore: You don’t need to be a scientist to know that the earth is round, that the sun rises in the east and sets in the west, and that gravity is the reason that objects fall to the ground.”

— John Kerry, to The New York Times



We don't know exactly what Kerry and DiCaprio chatted about in Paris yet (again, what I'd give to be one of those glasses of water)...

But I imagine the conversation topic would have put a smile on the face of anyone even a tad bit concerned about the future of our planet — and humanity.

If that's you, you can do something this very second to support a renewable energy future. Sign this petition by the League of Conservation Voters to throw your weight behind the EPA's Clean Power Plan. (If not for the sake of humanity, because you know it'd make DiCaprio proud.)

via The Today Show

Michael and Jack McConnell will celebrate their 50th wedding anniversary on September 3rd and it won't only be a big moment for them, it'll be a landmark for the entire gay rights movement.

The couple was legally married 32 years before Massachusetts became the first state to legalize same-sex marriage in 2004 and 43 before it became federally legal in 2015.

How did they do it? They outsmarted a system that wasn't prepared to address same-sex marriage.

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via The Today Show

Michael and Jack McConnell will celebrate their 50th wedding anniversary on September 3rd and it won't only be a big moment for them, it'll be a landmark for the entire gay rights movement.

The couple was legally married 32 years before Massachusetts became the first state to legalize same-sex marriage in 2004 and 43 before it became federally legal in 2015.

How did they do it? They outsmarted a system that wasn't prepared to address same-sex marriage.

Keep Reading Show less
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If you've ever donated to a cause but worried that your contribution wasn't really enough to drive real change, you're not alone. As one person, it can be tough to feel like you're making a real difference, especially if you don't have a lot to donate or if times are tough (aka there's a worldwide pandemic going on.)

That's why, for years, the idea of philanthropy felt a little bit like a rich person's thing: if you had millions, you could donate and make change. The rest of us were just tossing pennies into a cup without really doing much.

But that's a problem: the priorities of a wealthy few don't represent the priorities of many, which means that good causes are often left underfunded, leading to a lack of meaningful action.

The thing is: it doesn't have to be like this. We can all make a difference, especially if we pool our money together.

Enter: Giving Circles. These are when groups of people with shared values come together to drive change. They do it by pooling their time and money together, then deciding as a circle where it should go. That way, they can cause a real targeted change in one place quickly in a very people-powered way by giving what they can, whether that's volunteer hours, money, or a mix of both. Best of all, Giving Circles are a social experience — you get to work together as a community to make sure you do the most good you can.

In other words, giving circles are a way to democratize philanthropy, making it more accessible regardless of your age, income, gender, or race.

That's why this year, The Elevate Prize, a nonprofit founded in 2019, is launching a new pop-up "Giving Circle" program so that problem solvers, budding philanthropists, and anyone that wants to do good can come together and drive real impact at a large scale. And you can do it all in just 90 minutes.

All you have to do is join one of the Elevate Giving Circles online. Learn about organizations doing good for the world, then pool your money together, and as a group, direct it where you think that donation could make the most difference.

But that's not all: every single donation made is matched by the Elevate Prize Foundation — basically guaranteeing that you double your impact for good. The theme for the first cycle is education, and Elevate Giving will match up to $75,000 in total donations for each cycle.

Ready to get involved? Elevate Giving experiences start June 26th, so sign up now for your spot to make a difference. There's no minimum fee to join either — so get involved no matter what you have to give. Now that's philanthropy for all.