When a fan yelled anti-Muslim comments before a Packers game, Aaron Rodgers couldn't let it stand.

Before Sunday's game against the Detroit Lions, the Green Bay Packers asked their fans to observe a moment of silence to honor the victims of Friday's deadly shooting in Paris.

Photo by Joe Robbins/Getty Images.


While many did, one fan took advantage of the quiet moment to yell out something obnoxious.

Photo by Joe Robbins/Getty Images.

"Muslims suck," is what many heard, according to a report in The Washington Post. Including Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers.

Rodgers was asked to respond to the comment after the game, and respond eloquently he did.


"I must admit I was very disappointed with whoever the fan was who made a comment," Rodgers said.

"I thought it was really inappropriate during the moment of silence. It's that kind of prejudicial ideology that I think puts us in the position that we're in today as a world."

Rodgers is right to call out the fan's bigotry, and it's a lesson much of the world could stand to hear right now.

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Following the attacks, talk of tightening — or even closing — state and national borders in Western countries to refugees from the Middle East has increased, even though many of those refugees are fleeing the exact same people who committed the horrible act of violence in Paris last weekend.

Some have even gone as far as to suggest that the United States should focus on admitting Christian — not Muslim — refugees.

Good guys and bad guys can't be sorted by their religion.

Radical extremists come from all religions and all nationalities and threaten people of all religions and all nationalities — as last week's far-less-heralded, but similarly deadly bombing in Beirut makes abundantly clear. Presenting the current conflict as a clash of religions or civilizations only makes it easier for them to victimize more of the world's most vulnerable people.

That's why Rodgers' comments are an important wake-up call.

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The only way to defeat the bad guys is by standing together. Not apart.

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If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.