When a fan yelled anti-Muslim comments before a Packers game, Aaron Rodgers couldn't let it stand.

Before Sunday's game against the Detroit Lions, the Green Bay Packers asked their fans to observe a moment of silence to honor the victims of Friday's deadly shooting in Paris.

Photo by Joe Robbins/Getty Images.


While many did, one fan took advantage of the quiet moment to yell out something obnoxious.

Photo by Joe Robbins/Getty Images.

"Muslims suck," is what many heard, according to a report in The Washington Post. Including Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers.

Rodgers was asked to respond to the comment after the game, and respond eloquently he did.


"I must admit I was very disappointed with whoever the fan was who made a comment," Rodgers said.

"I thought it was really inappropriate during the moment of silence. It's that kind of prejudicial ideology that I think puts us in the position that we're in today as a world."

Rodgers is right to call out the fan's bigotry, and it's a lesson much of the world could stand to hear right now.

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Following the attacks, talk of tightening — or even closing — state and national borders in Western countries to refugees from the Middle East has increased, even though many of those refugees are fleeing the exact same people who committed the horrible act of violence in Paris last weekend.

Some have even gone as far as to suggest that the United States should focus on admitting Christian — not Muslim — refugees.

Good guys and bad guys can't be sorted by their religion.

Radical extremists come from all religions and all nationalities and threaten people of all religions and all nationalities — as last week's far-less-heralded, but similarly deadly bombing in Beirut makes abundantly clear. Presenting the current conflict as a clash of religions or civilizations only makes it easier for them to victimize more of the world's most vulnerable people.

That's why Rodgers' comments are an important wake-up call.

Photo by Stacy Revere/Getty Images.

The only way to defeat the bad guys is by standing together. Not apart.

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This story was originally shared on Capital One.

Inside the walls of her kitchen at her childhood home in Guatemala, Evelyn Klohr, the founder of a Washington, D.C.-area bakery called Kakeshionista, was taught a lesson that remains central to her business operations today.

"Baking cakes gave me the confidence to believe in my own brand and now I put my heart into giving my customers something they'll enjoy eating," Klohr said.

While driven to launch her own baking business, pursuing a dream in the culinary arts was economically challenging for Klohr. In the United States, culinary schools can open doors to future careers, but the cost of entry can be upwards of $36,000 a year.

Through a friend, Klohr learned about La Cocina VA, a nonprofit dedicated to providing job training and entrepreneurship development services at a training facility in the Washington, D.C-area.

La Cocina VA's, which translates to "the kitchen" in Spanish, offers its Bilingual Culinary Training program to prepare low-and moderate-income individuals from diverse backgrounds to launch careers in the food industry.

That program gave Klohr the ability to fully immerse herself in the baking industry within a professional kitchen facility and receive training in an array of subjects including culinary skills, food safety, career development and English language classes.

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Dr. David McPhee offers advice for talking to someone living in a different time in their head.

Few things are more difficult than watching a loved one's grip on reality slipping away. Dementia can be brutal for families and caregivers, and knowing how to handle the various stages can be tricky to figure out.

The Alzheimer's Association offers tips for communicating in the early, middle and late stages of the disease, as dementia manifests differently as the disease progresses. The Family Caregiver Alliance also offers advice for talking to someone with various forms and phases of dementia. Some communication tips deal with confusion, agitation and other challenging behaviors that can come along with losing one's memory, and those tips are incredibly important. But what about when the person is seemingly living in a different time, immersed in their memories of the past, unaware of what has happened since then?

Psychologist David McPhee shared some advice with a person on Quora who asked, "How do I answer my dad with dementia when he talks about his mom and dad being alive? Do I go along with it or tell him they have passed away?"

McPhee wrote:

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