This WWE superstar just danced to 'I'm Too Sexy' in the name of cancer research. It was perfect.

A lot of celebrities give selflessly to important causes. But the real question is, can they dance?

For WWE superstar Daniel Bryan, the answer is a definitive "Yes! Yes! Yes!"


This week, he posted a video of himself to Twitter using the hashtag #JustKeepDancing, which was created earlier this year to raise awareness and funds for pediatric cancer research.


Whether you're a wrestling fan or not, this is definitely worth a watch.

And the story behind his goofy tweet is even more worthwhile.

All GIFs and images from Daniel Bryan/Twitter.

But first, some color commentary on Bryan's dance moves.

You have to love Bryan's commitment here. This is no stiff-hipped Macarena. Bryan attacks his song of choice (Right Said Fred's "I'm Too Sexy," of course) like one of his in-ring opponents, including a dramatic entrance.

Aaaaand pauses for effect:

Then the three-time WWE heavyweight champion starts with a devastating 360 arm twirl.

Followed by a crushing, side-shuffling finger wag.

A short celebratory march, for good measure.

And finally, he breaks out his finishing move: twirling kung-fu hands.

Someone ring the bell because this one is over.

Of course, we know wrestling is fake, but to young kids around the world (OK, and some adults, too) athletes like Bryan are real heroes.

Bryan posted the video in support of one small fan in particular, Connor "The Crusher" Michalek, and his foundation, Connor's Cure.

Connor, a fervent WWE fan and a big fan of Bryan's, passed away from a rare brain tumor at only 8 years old — but not before being inducted into the WWE Hall of Fame and capturing the hearts of many of his wrestling heroes.


"If you talked to Connor, you couldn't help but fall in love with him," Bryan says on the Connor's Cure website.

The American Cancer Society estimates over 10,000 children under the age of 15 will be diagnosed with some form of cancer this year.

With enough awareness and funding, aided by big-hearted celebs like Bryan, Connor's Cure hopes to put pediatric cancer out for the count.

True

If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.