Today, America lost one of its true political heroes with the passing of John Lewis. For more than 30 years, Lewis served in the U.S. House of Representatives representing the state of Georgia. He took part in many key historic votes and fights over legislation that have shaped our country and world over the past two generations. But for most Americans, his legacy stretches back to the fight for civil rights, where Lewis marched alongside Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and other leaders.

His personal bravery was truly exceptional. In 1963, Lewis was one of the key organizers of the landmark March on Washington where King gave his famous "I have a dream" speech. Lewis has rightfully been heralded by Democrats and Republicans alike for honoring the legacy of non-violent protests. At just 21-years-old, he was brutally assaulted by two white men in South Carolina while peacefully attempting to enter a whites only waiting room. In recent years, Lewis described how he stayed true to his principles of non-violence in the face of hatred and real violence: "We were determined not to let any act of violence keep us from our goal. We knew our lives could be threatened, but we had made up our minds not to turn back."

One of the many Americans inspired by Lewis is former President Barack Obama. The direct line between the leadership Lewis demonstrated and the historic presidency of Obama is clear to anyone. So, it's not surprising that Obama has written an incredibly powerful essay in honor of Lewis and his life.


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ABC World news Tonight / Twitter

The Class of 2020 has to feel massively let down this time of year. After working so hard to reach the finish line, most won't be able to attend a public graduation ceremony. They'll also miss out on traditional graduation events such as prom, banquets, senior ditch day, and baccalaureate.

To help make graduation day feel like less of a drag, California high school senior Lincoln Debenham tweeted Barack Obama last month asking him to give a speech to the nation's 2020 graduating class to make up for the lost ceremony.


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via Monroe Gallery / Twitter

Hundreds of people gathered at the Arizona State Capitol on Monday to protest Governor Doug Ducey's stay-at-home order that closed non-essential businesses in March.

The protesters waved pro-Trump flags and held up banners that read, "Give me liberty or give me COIVD-19," "Cure is worse than the virus," and "Make America work again."

Apparently, no one told the protesters that Donald Trump is in favor of the stay-at-home order and that he also doesn't really like liberty.

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Update: In addition to the YouGov poll, Gallup's annual poll has also found Michelle Obama to be the world's most admired woman for 2019. In fact, she was the only woman in the poll to rank in the double digits. Now it's doubly official—people can't get enough Michelle. This story originally appeared on 7/19/19. The original version begins below.

The world officially loves Michelle Obama.

The former first lady has overtaken the number one spot in a poll of the world's most admired women. Conducted by online research firm YouGov, the study uses international polling tools to survey people in countries around the world about who they most admire.

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