Chrissy Teigen wants to 'Make Trump's Birthday Great Again' — by shading him. Here's how.

Chrissy Teigen is no fan of Donald Trump, which is why her plan to "Make Trump's Birthday Great Again" had people like đź‘€.

In honor of the president's 72nd birthday, Teigen, her husband John Legend, and their two children, each chipped in a cool $72,000 for an unforgettable present: a massive donation to the American Civil Liberties Union.

Posting on Twitter, Teigen explained how you can get in on the gift as well.


Her post reads:

"John and I are outraged to see and hear the horror stories of immigrant families seeking asylum and refuge in America being ripped apart due to the inhumane policies of the Trump administration. These actions are cruel, anti-family and go against everything we believe this country should represent. The ACLU is committed to defending the rights and humanity of these vulnerable families. In addition to fighting for immigrants' rights, they're advocating for reproductive rights, voting rights, criminal justice reform, LGBT rights, 1st amendment rights and holding the Trump administration accountable whenever possible.

The President celebrates his 72nd birthday today. On this auspicious occasion, in order to Make Trump's Birthday Great Again, each member of our family has donated $72,000 to the ACLU.

If you would like to donate $7.20, $72, or whatever you like to the ACLU in honor of this blessed day, please go to www.aclu.com/72.

With love, Chrissy, John, Luna and Miles"





The ACLU does a lot of great work, and in the Trump era, they're more needed than ever.

The ACLU is fighting back against actions the administration has taken on asylum seekers at the southern border, they've taken the administration to court over the so-called Muslim ban, they're advocating for detained immigrants and asylum-seekers and their right to reproductive health care, they're making strong arguments against anti-LGBTQ discrimination, they're speaking out against unjust government surveillance, they're fighting against U.S. citizens being sent to other countries without due process — and so, so, so much more.

It's important to remember that the ACLU isn't a partisan organization, which is a good thing. The government must be held accountable by the people no matter who's in charge.

If you want to get in on the action, head on over to aclu.com/72 to help fund the fight for the rights of all of us.

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When a pet is admitted to a shelter it can be a traumatizing experience. Many are afraid of their new surroundings and are far from comfortable showing off their unique personalities. The problem is that's when many of them have their photos taken to appear in online searches.

Chewy, the pet retailer who has dedicated themselves to supporting shelters and rescues throughout the country, recognized the important work of a couple in Tampa, FL who have been taking professional photos of shelter pets to help get them adopted.

"If it's a photo of a scared animal, most people, subconsciously or even consciously, are going to skip over it," pet photographer Adam Goldberg says. "They can't visualize that dog in their home."

Adam realized the importance of quality shelter photos while working as a social media specialist for the Humane Society of Broward County in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

"The photos were taken top-down so you couldn't see the size of the pet, and the flash would create these red eyes," he recalls. "Sometimes [volunteers] would shoot the photos through the chain-link fences."

That's why Adam and his wife, Mary, have spent much of their free time over the past five years photographing over 1,200 shelter animals to show off their unique personalities to potential adoptive families. The Goldbergs' wonderful work was recently profiled by Chewy in the video above entitled, "A Day in the Life of a Shelter Pet Photographer."

A young boy tried to grab the Pope's skull cap

A boy of about 10-years-old with a mental disability stole the show at Pope Francis' weekly general audience on Wednesday at the Vatican auditorium. In front of an audience of thousands the boy walked past security and onto the stage while priests delivered prayers and introductory speeches.

The boy, later identified as Paolo, Jr., greeted the pope by shaking his hand and when it was clear that he had no intention of leaving, the pontiff asked Monsignor Leonardo Sapienza, the head of protocol, to let the boy borrow his chair.

The boy's activity on the stage was clearly a breach of Vatican protocol but Pope Francis didn't seem to be bothered one bit. He looked at the child with a sense of joy and wasn't even disturbed when he repeatedly motioned that he wanted to remove his skull cap.

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