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People are roasting the hell out of Eric Trump today about posting one unintentionally hilarious tweet last night.

Eric Trump tweeted that he “hates” disloyal people. Funny he should mention that.

The list of former Trump friends and associates that have turned against the president continues to grow each day.

By now, we’re all familiar with him responding badly to criticism. But he appears to have taken the fallout from Omarosa Manigault Newman particularly hard. Some even say it has left him “unhinged.”


That reaction has apparently spread to the Trump family. Eric Trump posted to Twitter on Thursday night and was presumably taking a shot at Newman when he wrote:

“I truly hate disloyal people.”

It didn’t take long for a legion of people online to respond to the unintentionally hilarious post with reactions ranging from the absurd to perfectly insightful.

The responses were hilarious, overwhelming and the exact opposite of what he was expecting.

"Tough guys" like the Trumps like to talk about loyalty while displaying none of it themselves. There's an old understanding that loyalty is earned. For some, there's the misunderstanding that it is inherited or bought. Perhaps Eric Trump thought he'd sound strong and businesslike.

Instead, it was, put simply, an "epic backfire."

After all, it's hard to talk about loyalty when you and your family are literally under investigation for colluding with an American adversary.

I mean, right?

And funny you should mention it...

I mean, if only there were a transparently disreputable academic institution that could give out degrees in absurdity. Maybe something like...

But c'mon Eric.

This could be the guest house.


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Kevin Parry / Twitter

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Pop Culture

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OriginalAll photos belong to Red Méthot, who gave me permission to share them here.

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Democracy

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