There was some beautiful, historic black girl magic in the sweet state of Georgia on the night of May 22, 2018.

Photo by Jessica McGowan/Getty Images.


Stacey Abrams won the Democratic nomination for governor, becoming the first black woman in U.S. history to lead a major party in a gubernatorial race.

Photo by Jessica McGowan/Getty Images.

Her landmark victory sparked passion, excitement, and downright thrill across the nation. Many were pretty darn stoked.

YES YES YES ~ @staceyabrams #teamabrams

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Though considered an underdog, Abrams real shot at taking on such an important political role is profound. If she wins, she would be the first black female governor in American history.

Abrams speaks at the 2016 Democratic National Convention. Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images.

Historically, black people have been extremely engaged in politics and activism, but few have been able to take leading roles in government.

Currently, of the 535 members of Congress, 51 are black (46 representatives, two delegates, and three senators). Those numbers are even smaller for black women. The vast majority of black women currently in elected office represent majority-minority areas. But, with a win like this, Abrams is making it clear that the glass ceiling no longer exists for women of color.  

"We are writing the next chapter of Georgia's history, where no one is unseen, no one is unheard, and no one is uninspired," Abrams said to supporters at an Atlanta hotel.

Photo by Jessica McGowan/Getty Images.

Abrams' road to the finish line won't be easy. Georgia is known as being a predominately red state when it comes to major elections. She'll be going up against a Republican nominee, likely the winner of a runoff in July between Lt. Gov. Casey Cagle and Secretary of State Brian Kemp, both heavy hitters in their party.

In spite of all these barriers, Abrams has proven she's up for the challenge, and it's safe to say she got some rad support behind her.

So what happens next?

Abrams will continue to prepare to run against a Republican candidate, and voters will make their choice known at the polls on Nov. 6, 2018. It should be an exciting ride to the finish line.

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Researchers at the University of Houston have developed a filtration system that can instantly neutralize and kill 99.8% of the coronavirus after a single pass through.

"It's basically a high-performance COVID-19 killer," Dr. Garrett Peel of Medistar, who helped craft the design, said according to Fox News.

The filter looks to be an important tool in fighting a virus that can remain in the air for hours and, in turn, spread more readily than viruses like the common flu. Harvard Health says that aerosolized coronavirus can remain in the air for up to three hours.

People who are asymptomatic can easily spread it to multiple people when they talk, breathe, cough, or sneeze.

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