A black woman is a major party's candidate for governor. It's a groundbreaking first.

There was some beautiful, historic black girl magic in the sweet state of Georgia on the night of May 22, 2018.

Photo by Jessica McGowan/Getty Images.


Stacey Abrams won the Democratic nomination for governor, becoming the first black woman in U.S. history to lead a major party in a gubernatorial race.

Photo by Jessica McGowan/Getty Images.

Her landmark victory sparked passion, excitement, and downright thrill across the nation. Many were pretty darn stoked.

YES YES YES ~ @staceyabrams #teamabrams

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Though considered an underdog, Abrams real shot at taking on such an important political role is profound. If she wins, she would be the first black female governor in American history.

Abrams speaks at the 2016 Democratic National Convention. Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images.

Historically, black people have been extremely engaged in politics and activism, but few have been able to take leading roles in government.

Currently, of the 535 members of Congress, 51 are black (46 representatives, two delegates, and three senators). Those numbers are even smaller for black women. The vast majority of black women currently in elected office represent majority-minority areas. But, with a win like this, Abrams is making it clear that the glass ceiling no longer exists for women of color.  

"We are writing the next chapter of Georgia's history, where no one is unseen, no one is unheard, and no one is uninspired," Abrams said to supporters at an Atlanta hotel.

Photo by Jessica McGowan/Getty Images.

Abrams' road to the finish line won't be easy. Georgia is known as being a predominately red state when it comes to major elections. She'll be going up against a Republican nominee, likely the winner of a runoff in July between Lt. Gov. Casey Cagle and Secretary of State Brian Kemp, both heavy hitters in their party.

In spite of all these barriers, Abrams has proven she's up for the challenge, and it's safe to say she got some rad support behind her.

So what happens next?

Abrams will continue to prepare to run against a Republican candidate, and voters will make their choice known at the polls on Nov. 6, 2018. It should be an exciting ride to the finish line.

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If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.