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“Sometimes, you need to change perspectives in order to gain new insights!”

“Sometimes, you need to change perspectives in order to gain new insights!” is not exactly a sentence one might expect to hear from a corporate exec, but it is a philosophy that led Jens Ritter, CEO of German company Lufthansa Airlines, to taking on a shift as a flight attendant.

In a post shared on LinkedIn, Ritter detailed his experience of working as additional cabin crew for a flight heading to Riyadh and Bahrain, taking care of passengers in business class.

Though Ritter’s previous career as a pilot gave him some insight into the challenges of working a flight, taking on the responsibilities of an attendant left him “astonished.”


"I was amazed by how much there is to organize, especially if something doesn't go as planned,” Ritter recalled, noting how on his flight the offered menu items weren’t actually the meals loaded onto the plane.

Beyond purely administrative tasks, Ritter acknowledged the difficult task of addressing individual wishes and dealing with different energies (something airline attendants don’t get credit for nearly enough).

Lufthansa Airlines

Jens Ritter working as a flight attendant on Lufthansa Airlines

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And on that note, Ritter found it particularly taxing to “be present and attentive and charming” during an overnight flight “when the biological clock just tells you to sleep.” He confessed that it was an “entirely different” experience than what pilots endure.

Ritter concluded his post by thanking the cabin crew and said that his time spent on the ground (well, on the ground, in the air) would make “deciding things in the office different” moving forward.

At a time when stories of out-of-touch, greedy CEOs inundate the headlines, it’s refreshing to see those in managerial positions actively try to connect, empathize and support their workers, rather than exploit all resources for a bottom line. Not enough business heads recognize how crucial this kind of connection is—not just for the sake of virtue, but for the profit they so desperately want to maintain. But as Ritter’s action shows, it’s not all corporate greed out there.

flight attendant

Ritter found it particularly taxing to “be present and attentive and charming” during an overnight flight.

media.licdn.com

We could probably all stand to benefit from taking a shift in the service industry. The stress of having to maintain everyone’s good time while simultaneously problem-solving, organizing and generally keeping things afloat is not for the faint of heart. And flight attendants in particular juggle it all on a daily basis—and some even manage to make it a show. It’s great that Ritter is advocating for flight attendants by stepping into their shoes.

All in all, a change in perspective can lead to wonderful things.

Walter Carr was all set for his first day of a new job, but then his car broke down 20 miles from work.  

With the car dead and his new job with a moving company called Bellhops on the line, Carr knew he only had one choice: to walk. So after taking a four-hour nap to give him strength, the Birmingham, Alabama, resident started the long walk to work at midnight.

It took him another four hours to get to his destination.


At 3 a.m., several officers saw Carr walking through a neighborhood and stopped to ask where we was going.

After Carr told them about his journey, the officers took him to breakfast and then to a church, where they thought he'd have a safe place to rest until his job started.

But not wanting to be late for the first moving job of the day, Carr took off for Jenny and Chris Lamey's home. Another officer — who'd just come on the clock and heard Carr's story — picked him up and drove him the rest of the way.

By 6:30 a.m., the Lameys got a knock at their door. Carr had made it to work and was ready to move their household. Carr put in a full day, refusing even a short nap before he started.

Jenny Lamey, so impressed with Carr's perseverance, shared the story on Facebook. The post has since gone viral, amassing hundreds of shares.

Somehow my original post was deleted. Here is it again!! I am overwhelmed that it was shared over 800 times in one day!...

Posted by Jenny Hayden Lamey on Sunday, July 15, 2018

The CEO of Bellhops caught wind of Carr's journey.

Luke Marklin, the CEO of Bellhops, drove from Tennessee to meet the guy who'd walked 20 miles to get to work. By the end of their meeting, Carr was walking away with something more than just a clap on the shoulder.

Marklin gifted Carr his own car to make sure that he wouldn't have to choose walking over sleeping before work again. Jenny Lamey also contributed, starting a GoFundMe that's raised more than $8,000 for Carr's future.

"I want people to know this: No matter what the challenge is, you can break through the challenge," Carr told AL.com. "Nothing is impossible unless you make it impossible. You can do anything you set your mind to."

Watch Carr get his new car below:

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