McDonald’s Is Feeling The Heat, Y’all! How About We Kick It Up A Notch?
True
Workonomics

Over the last year, we have posted several things about McDonald's — how it treats and pays its workers, some of its rather bizarre PR and social media schemes that totally backfired, and more. It turns out the company is feeling the pressure. In a recent Securities and Exchange Commission filing, it admitted that “the long-term trend toward higher wages and social expenses ... which may intensify with increasing public focus on matters of income inequality” may affect future profits (you know, the ones paying its last CEO almost $9 million ... do you want fries with that?).

It also listed “the impact of campaigns by labor organizations and activists, including through the use of social media and other mobile communications and applications.”


And it's not just McDonald's. Here are a few more recent victories:

  • A group of health care workers in L.A. is getting a raise to $15/hour.
  • Workers at and near SeaTac Airport in Washington state won a referendum vote to raise the minimum wage to $15/hour, as well as some paid sick time.
  • NYC airport workers are moving up to $10.10/hour.
  • The Gap is raising starting wages to $10 by next year.
  • Seattle McDonald's owners and operators say they're discussing raising minimum wages at their restaurants and are not fighting wage hikes.

What does it mean?

We're winning, that's what. With every click, every share, and every picket sign outside a fast-food joint, we're changing things. As a rep from one of the organizations involved, Low Pay Is Not OK, told us recently: "When we're taking on some of the largest corporations in the world, we need a huge megaphone to amplify these fast-food and low-wage workers' demands for $15 an hour and the right to form a union without interference. Upworthy has played a crucial role in spreading workers' stories as well as some of our videos and graphics that show how McDonald's is out of touch with its workers. Today is proof of the impact we're having together."

Here are some of the things we've posted that generated a lot of interest and attention.

Albert Einstein

One of the strangest things about being human is that people of lesser intelligence tend to overestimate how smart they are and people who are highly intelligent tend to underestimate how smart they are.

This is called the Dunning-Kruger effect and it’s proven every time you log onto Facebook and see someone from high school who thinks they know more about vaccines than a doctor.

The interesting thing is that even though people are poor judges of their own smarts, we’ve evolved to be pretty good at judging the intelligence of others.

“Such findings imply that, in order to be adaptive, first impressions of personality or social characteristics should be accurate,” a study published in the journal Intelligence says. “There is accumulating evidence that this is indeed the case—at least to some extent—for traits such as intelligence extraversion, conscientiousness, openness, and narcissism, and even for characteristics such as sexual orientation, political ideology, or antigay prejudice.”

Keep Reading Show less

"I now pronounce you, in debt. You may kiss the bride."

In 1964, Paul McCartney of the Beatles famously sang, “I don’t care too much for money, money can’t buy me love.” While Mr. McCartney’s sentiments were definitely a major foreshadowing of the hippie, free-love movement that was to come in the ‘60s, it appears as though he was also onto a big truth that wouldn’t be proven for another 50 years.

Seven years ago, researchers Hugo M. Mialon and Andrew Francis-Tan from Emory University embarked on the first study to determine whether spending a lot on a wedding or engagement ring meant a marriage would succeed or fail.

The pair wanted to see if the wedding industry was being honest when it came to claims that the more money a couple spends, the more likely they are to stay together.

“The wedding industry has consistently sought to link wedding spending with long-lasting marriages. This paper is the first to examine this relationship statistically,” the researchers wrote.

Keep Reading Show less

Kelly Clarkson and Ariana Grande duked it out on Jimmy Fallon's 'The Tonight Show.'

There are pop stars, and then there are singers. While recording studio technology can make people sound like amazing singers, the proof is in their live performances.

Kelly Clarkson and Ariana Grande took it a whole step further on "The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon," delivering not only a jaw-dropping live performance but doing so in the form of revolving pop diva hits in an "impossible karaoke" showdown. In less than five minutes, they showed off their combined ability to nail pretty much anything, from imitating iconic singers' styles to belting out well-known songs with their own vocal stylings.

Watch this and try not to be impressed:

Keep Reading Show less