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See a woman explain one of the most unfair things about being a woman — in only 15 seconds.

Remember the "this is your brain on drugs" commercial from the '90s? Where the guy cracked an egg into a frying pan, stared at the camera, and said, "Any questions?" Well, this video is just like that.

See a woman explain one of the most unfair things about being a woman — in only 15 seconds.
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Any questions?

*mic drop*


*picks mic back up*

Apparently there are some questions.

The first is about the actual size of the gap. The above video builds on the most commonly used statistic: A woman makes 77 cents for every $1 a man earns. While that figure fluctuates from 77 to 80 cents depending upon the source, the reality is that even with a cent here and a cent there, according to American Association of University Women's "The Simple Truth About the Gender Pay Gap," the gap has barely budged in a decade. So that's the point.

The second question is the doozy, often asked by people who want to deny the reality of gender bias and place blame for the disparity squarely on the shoulders of women:

"Don't women make less money because of their own choices?"

Sorry, no. The Center for American Progress recently debunked that myth completely. While the gender gap is caused by many factors, it cannot be explained away just by saying that women don't ask for higher salaries, don't go for the higher-paying jobs, and generally don't "lean in" enough.

A Bloomberg study showed that in 17 of 22 industries with all other factors being equal, women were offered lower starting salaries than men.

And while there are some choices that women make that influence this gap — namely the "choice" to take off time to care for children at a higher rate than men — only 10% of the difference can be attributed to this fact.

Overall, the data is clear: "At any education level, a man will make more than a woman. He'll also make more in any industry — including female-dominated ones — and virtually every job."

And if you want to nerd out and really have your mind blown, check out this video from Pew Research Center on the wage gap:

OK. Feel knowledgeable enough to keep reminding your friends, family, coworkers, neighbors, Twitter followers, mechanic, dentist, dry cleaner, and anyone else you know about the gender pay gap? Good. Then here's an easy way to do it: Go ahead and share this post.

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In 1945, the world had just endured the bloodiest war in history. World leaders were determined to not repeat the mistakes of the past. They wanted to build a better future, one free from the "scourge of war" so they signed the UN Charter — creating a global organization of nations that could deter and repel aggressors, mediate conflicts and broker armistices, and ensure collective progress.

Over the following 75 years, the UN played an essential role in preventing, mitigating or resolving conflicts all over the world. It faced new challenges and new threats — including the spread of nuclear weapons and other weapons of mass destruction, a Cold War and brutal civil wars, transnational terrorism and genocides. Today, the UN faces new tensions: shifting and more hostile geopolitics, digital weaponization, a global pandemic, and more.

This slideshow shows how the UN has worked to build peace and security around the world:

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Malians wait in line at a free clinic run by the UN Multidimensional Integrated Mission in Mali in 2014. Over their 75 year history, UN peacekeepers have deployed around the world in military and nonmilitary roles as they work towards human security and peace. Here's a look back at their history.

Photo credit: UN Photo/Marco Dormino

via Tom Ward / Instagram

Artist Tom Ward has used his incredible illustration techniques to give us some new perspective on modern life through popular Disney characters. "Disney characters are so iconic that I thought transporting them to our modern world could help us see it through new eyes," he told The Metro.

Tom says he wanted to bring to life "the times we live in and communicate topical issues in a relatable way."

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Schools often have to walk a fine line when it comes to parental complaints. Diverse backgrounds, beliefs, and preferences for what kids see and hear will always mean that schools can't please everyone all the time, so educators have to discern what's best for the whole, broad spectrum of kids in their care.

Sometimes, what's best is hard to discern. Sometimes it's absolutely not.

Such was the case this week when a parent at a St. Louis elementary school complained in a Facebook group about a book that was read to her 7-year-old. The parent wrote:

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