Dan Rather had the perfect response to Trump's complaint about 'a lack of civility.'

At 86, Dan Rather has been around long enough to have serious perspective.

The former CBS evening news anchor has found a second life as a forceful voice of reason in the Trump era, communicating largely to his growing legion of Facebook followers.

Rather's latest truth bomb came after President Trump and his supporters complained of "a lack of civility" in the wake of White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders being asked to leave a Virginia restaurant.


"President Trump and the GOP bemoaning a lack of civility is a hypocritical farce," Rather wrote. "It spurs an almost uncontrollable bout of forehead slapping in disbelief."

Photo by Dimitrios Kambouris/Getty Images for IFP.

To show what "incivility really looks like," Rather went on to list 17 examples of what the Trump administration has done in less than 18 months.

Rather's list includes everything from Trump questioning President Obama's citizenship to attacking NFL players for exercising their First Amendment right to kneel during the national anthem.

But a consistent theme is how Trump's actions and those of his administration have actively worked to undermine our national institutions and societal norms:

Incivility is our government's response to Puerto Rico.

Incivility is undermining a merited investigation by respected law enforcement officials and maligning the notion of an independent judiciary.

Incivility is cozying up to dictators and attacking our allies and friends.

Incivility is ripping children — even those too young to know their parent's name — from immigrants legally claiming asylum.

Rather has publicly tussled with other Republican presidents before. He famously quarrelled with then-Vice President George H.W. Bush on national TV and ultimately lost his job after investigating the National Guard record of then-President George W. Bush.

This is different.

For Rather, this is less a debate about politics and more a question of basic morality and how we collectively choose to carry ourselves as a nation.

"We will only succeed if we have a civil society," he wrote. "And anything or anyone who attacks that cherished American ideal must be considered ... uncivil."

President Trump and the GOP bemoaning a lack of civility is a hypocritical farce. It spurs an almost uncontrollable bout...

Posted by Dan Rather on Tuesday, June 26, 2018

Honest, respectable discussions on public policy and the U.S.'s role in the world are essential. No one side has all the answers.

Even in some of our most heated debates, however, both sides generally have argued from a place of how their policy or proposal would strengthen our institutions, not weaken them.

Getting back to a civil discourse is a fight worth having — and that means serious talk about what "uncivil" behavior really means.

Photo by Anna Shvets from Pexels
True

Increasingly customers are looking for more conscious shopping options. According to a Nielsen survey in 2018, nearly half (48%) of U.S. consumers say they would definitely or probably change their consumption habits to reduce their impact on the environment.

But while many consumers are interested in spending their money on products that are more sustainable, few actually follow through. An article in the 2019 issue of Harvard Business Review revealed that 65% of consumers said they want to buy purpose-driven brands that advocate sustainability, but only about 26% actually do so. It's unclear where this intention gap comes from, but thankfully it's getting more convenient to shop sustainably from many of the retailers you already support.

Amazon recently introduced Climate Pledge Friendly, "a new program to help make it easy for customers to discover and shop for more sustainable products." When you're browsing Amazon, a Climate Pledge Friendly label will appear on more than 45,000 products to signify they have one or more different sustainability certifications which "help preserve the natural world, reducing the carbon footprint of shipments to customers," according to the online retailer.

Amazon

In order to distinguish more sustainable products, the program partnered with a wide range of external certifications, including governmental agencies, non-profits, and independent laboratories, all of which have a focus on preserving the natural world.

Keep Reading Show less
True

If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.