Cara Delevingne loved Beyoncé's set — but 'still wouldn't go' to Coachella. Here's why.

So. There's this musical artist named Beyoncé. (Maybe you've heard of her?) And she just changed everything.

OK, changed everything might be dramatic. But she did make history.

Photo by Larry Busacca/Getty Images for Coachella.


Beyoncé became the first black woman to headline Coachella — a massive, two-weekend musical festival in the dusty, dry desert of Indio, California.

And people were loving her nearly two-hour set.

Like, really, really, head-over-heels obsessing over the experience history will now remember as #Beychella.

One big fan of Beyoncé's next-level performance was Cara Delevingne.

Photo by Tristan Fewings/Getty Images.

On Instagram, the actress and model posted an image from #Beychella and expressed how moved she'd been by the powerful performance.

"I am speechless," she wrote. "That performance made me burst into tears and sent shivers down my spine."

But fans were quick to note, however, that Delevingne has lambasted Coachella in the past, as Billboard reported.

The actress previously made clear she would never be supporting Coachella after word began spreading in 2016 that Philip Anschutz — whose entertainment group owns the festival — uses his deep pockets to support several anti-LGBTQ, anti-abortion rights, and pro-gun advocacy groups and politicians.

Philip Anschutz. Photo by Harry How/Getty Images.

Many critics of the music festival have been airing their grievances on social media, using the hashtag #NoChella to voice their concerns over Anschutz's politics.

Delevingne, who identifies as bisexual, has been a vocal advocate against the music festival. But clearly, her Instagram post celebrated Beyoncé's big night, directing her 41 million followers to the bright stage lights of Indio.

Was Delevingne being hypocritical?

In a statement posted to her Instagram story, Delevingne fiercely defended her praise of Beyoncé while continuing to condemn Anschutz:

"Some people are commenting on the fact that I posted about my anger towards the owner of Coachella and then about Beyoncé. My hashtag was #NoChella. I still refuse to go to a festival that is owned by someone who is anti-LGBT and pro-gun. I am allowed to shame that man and the festival and show my appreciation of an artist at the same time."

Delevingne's nuanced response nailed why feelings aren't mutually exclusive things.  

She can appreciate an artist who championed Historically Black Colleges, made actual history, and basically ran the world in an almost two-hour on-stage extravaganza, while also despising the very same festival stage that artist performed on.

She's allowed to feel both those things — without also feeling like a hypocrite.

"Just because I love Beyoncé doesn't mean I now love Coachella," Delevingne concluded in her Instagram story. "I still wouldn't go. And I will let nothing get in the way of me showing my love or hate for something. Don't let anyone come between you and your truth."

True

Davina Agudelo was born in Miami, Florida, but she grew up in Medellín, Colombia.

"I am so grateful for my upbringing in Colombia, surrounded by mountains and mango trees, and for my Colombian family," Agudelo says. "Colombia is the place where I learned what's truly essential in life." It's also where she found her passion for the arts.

While she was growing up, Colombia was going through a violent drug war, and Agudelo turned to literature, theater, singing, and creative writing as a refuge. "Journaling became a sacred practice, where I could leave on the page my dreams & longings as well as my joy and sadness," she says. "During those years, poetry came to me naturally. My grandfather was a poet and though I never met him, maybe there is a little bit of his love for poetry within me."

In 1998, when she left her home and everyone she loved and moved to California, the arts continued to be her solace and comfort. She got her bachelor's degree in theater arts before getting certified in journalism at UCLA. It was there she realized the need to create a media platform that highlighted the positive contributions of LatinX in the US.

"I know the power that storytelling and writing our own stories have and how creative writing can aid us in our own transformation."

In 2012, she started Alegría Magazine and it was a great success. Later, she refurbished a van into a mobile bookstore to celebrate Latin American and LatinX indie authors and poets, while also encouraging children's reading and writing in low-income communities across Southern California.

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via Number 10 / Flickr

The United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB) approved a measure last month that could pave the way for the Catholic Church to deny President Joe Biden communion. The conservative bishops hope to prevent Biden from participating in the sacred ritual because of his support for abortion rights.

Biden is a devout Catholic who considered becoming a priest in his youth. He rarely misses mass, holds a rosary while making critical decisions, and often quotes scriptures. When asked about the bishops' decision Biden said it is "a private matter and I don't think that's going to happen."

The bishops hope the new guidance would push "Catholics who are cultural, political, or parochial leaders to witness the faith."

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