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Oregon hospital offers its weary healthcare heroes a room to rage-smash dinner plates
Photo by CHUTTERSNAP on Unsplash

When Salem Hospital healthcare workers are feeling stressed, the hospital's wellness department usually recommends yoga or deep breathing. But a year and a half into the COVID-19 pandemic, with a new surge of hospitalizations driven by people who refuse to utilize the freely available vaccine underway, healthcare workers are beyond stressed. They're wiped out, cried out, and burnt out—and yoga and deep breaths just aren't cutting it anymore.

To give employees an outlet for their frustrations, Salem Hospital set up a "rage room" area where workers can take out their anger by throwing dinner plates at a wall.

A Salem Hospital nurse named Lisa told AP News that she and her colleagues had hoped this Delta wave wouldn't hit, but it has. "And it's harder and worse, way worse, than before," she said. Right now they have 15 patients on ventilators and people dying in the ICU.

She said she has made ample use of the plate-smashing booth.

"We put on safety glasses, and we took plates and we shattered them. And I kept going back. I kept going back, and they told me I had enough turns."


That's right. Our healthcare workers are resorting to smashing plates in a rage room because people's refusal to get vaccinated is making work hell for them. Throwing a plate at a wall is a far better option than throwing a bedpan at a patient, and controlled acts of destruction may prevent a doctor or nurse at their wit's end from taking out their anger and exhaustion in an unhealthy way. But seriously? This is what we've come to?

Get it together, America. We're in a global freaking pandemic and we have a readily available vaccine that is very effective at keeping people out of the hospital. This really isn't complicated.

This new wave of hospitalizations is even happening in Oregon, which has fared comparatively well in the pandemic thus far. Implementing some of the strictest mitigation measures in the nation has resulted in some of the lowest COVID rates in the nation, and vaccination rates overall there are high. But those high rates are a bit skewed by certain counties. Some Oregon counties are still barely pushing 50% fully vaccinated, and combined with low levels of immunity from previous COVID infections (the ironic downside of having managed the pandemic well so far) the Delta surge is filling up hospitals. Since Oregon and Washington tie for the lowest numbers of hospital beds per capita in the U.S., there's not a ton of wiggle room for a wave of hospitalizations.

Things are even worse for healthcare workers in states with lower vaccination rates. Hospitals are full and they're filling up with patients younger and healthier than in previous waves. As Charles Fox, MD, chief medical officer for Ochsner/LSU Health System of North Louisiana says, "The new risk factor is, 'I'm not vaccinated.'"

Remember when we all rallied behind our healthcare heroes when we didn't know how to help them? Now we know how to help them.

Remaining unvaccinated may be a "personal choice," but it's one that affects everyone around you. You are more likely to get COVID, which means you're more likely to spread it and keep the pandemic raging. If you do get COVID, you're more likely to be hospitalized, which puts a strain on hospitals and healthcare workers. And when hospitals fill up with COVID patients, that prevents people with other urgent medical care needs from getting help, so your choice impacts them, too.

We have full hospitals and healthcare heroes throwing plates at walls, folks. Give them a break and get vaccinated.


Joy

1991 blooper clip of Robin Williams and Elmo is a wholesome nugget of comedic genius

Robin Williams is still bringing smiles to faces after all these years.

Robin Williams and Elmo (Kevin Clash) bloopers.

The late Robin Williams could make picking out socks funny, so pairing him with the fuzzy red monster Elmo was bound to be pure wholesome gold. Honestly, how the puppeteer, Kevin Clash, didn’t completely break character and bust out laughing is a miracle. In this short outtake clip, you get to see Williams crack a few jokes in his signature style while Elmo tries desperately to keep it together.

Williams has been a household name since what seems like the beginning of time, and before his death in 2014, he would make frequent appearances on "Sesame Street." The late actor played so many roles that if you were ask 10 different people what their favorite was, you’d likely get 10 different answers. But for the kids who spent their childhoods watching PBS, they got to see him being silly with his favorite monsters and a giant yellow canary. At least I think Big Bird is a canary.

When he stopped by "Sesame Street" for the special “Big Bird's Birthday or Let Me Eat Cake” in 1991, he was there to show Elmo all of the wonderful things you could do with a stick. Williams turns the stick into a hockey stick and a baton before losing his composure and walking off camera. The entire time, Elmo looks enthralled … if puppets can look enthralled. He’s definitely paying attention before slumping over at the realization that Williams goofed a line. But the actor comes back to continue the scene before Elmo slinks down inside his box after getting Williams’ name wrong, which causes his human co-star to take his stick and leave.

The little blooper reel is so cute and pure that it makes you feel good for a few minutes. For an additional boost of serotonin, check out this other (perfectly executed) clip about conflict that Williams did with the two-headed monster. He certainly had a way of engaging his audience, so it makes sense that even after all of these years, he's still greatly missed.

This article originally appeared on 08.21.18


Addie Rodriguez was supposed to take the field with her dad during a high school football game, where he, along with other dads, would lift her onto his shoulders for a routine. But Addie's dad was halfway across the country, unable to make the event.

Her father is Abel Rodriguez, a veteran airman who, after tours in Iraq and Afghanistan, was training at Travis Air Force Base in California, 1,700 miles from his family in San Antonio at the time.

"Mom missed the memo it was parent day, and the reason her mom missed the memo was her dad left Wednesday," said Alexis Perry-Rodriguez, Addie's mom. She continued, "It was really heartbreaking to see your daughter standing out there being the only one without their father, knowing why he's away. It's not just an absentee parent. He's serving our country."

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Pop Culture

She bought the perfect wedding dress that went viral on TikTok. It was only $3.75

Lynch is part of a growing line of newlyweds going against the regular wedding tradition of spending loads of money.

Making a priceless memory

Upon first glance, one might think that Jillian Lynch wore a traditional (read: expensive) dress to her wedding. After all, it did look glamorous on her. But this 32-year-old bride has a secret superpower: thrifting.

Lynch posted her bargain hunt on TikTok, sharing that she had been perusing thrift shops in Ohio for four days in a row, with the actual ceremony being only a month away. Lynch then displays an elegant ivory-colored Camila Coelho dress. Fitting perfectly, still brand new and with the tags on it, no less.

You can find that exact same dress on Revolve for $220. Lynch bought it for only $3.75.
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