The Consumer Electronics Show just banned a sex toy invented by and for women but awarded one made for men.

One would think that the forward-thinking minds behind the International Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas would be well beyond cowing to outdated double standards when it comes to sex. But, unfortunately, they’re not.

Lora DiCarlo, a woman-run start-up “determined to change the face of pleasure products" was selected as a CES 2019 Innovation Awards Honoree in the Robotics and Drone product category for the Osé personal massager.

According to Lora DiCarlo, CEO and founder Lora Haddock, this revolutionary hands-free sex toy for females uses “new micro-robotic technology that mimics all of the sensations of a human mouth, tongue, and fingers, for an experience that feels just like a real partner.”


The product also promises to help women achieve a blended orgasm which happens when clitoral and vaginal orgasms occur simultaneously.

No small feat.

The Osé personal massager was developed almost entirely by a female team of engineers.

After receiving the honor “My team rejoiced and celebrated,” Haddock wrote in an open letter. “A month later our excitement and preparations were cut short.”

Administrators with the Consumer Technology Association revoked the award, stating:

Entries deemed by CTA in their sole discretion to be immoral, obscene, indecent, profane or not in keeping with CTA's image will be disqualified. CTA reserves the right in its sole discretion to disqualify any entry at any time which, in CTA's opinion, endangers the safety or well being of any person, or fails to comply with these Official Rules.

Haddock responded by calling the CTA out for gender bias saying, “a literal sex doll for men launched on the floor at CES in 2018 and a VR porn company exhibits there every year, allowing men to watch pornography in public as consumers walk by.”

So this is ok? But a Osé personal massager for women is “ immoral, obscene, indecent, profane or not in keeping with CTA’s image"?

“Men’s sexuality is allowed to be explicit with a literal sex robot in the shape of an unrealistically proportioned woman and VR porn in point of pride along the aisle,” Haddock continued. “Female sexuality, on the other hand, is heavily muted if not outright banned. You cannot pretend to be unbiased if you allow a sex robot for men but not a vagina-focused robotic massager for blended orgasm.”

Lora DiCarlo has asked people to respond to the controversy by sharing their thoughts on twitter at #CESGenderBias.

Courtesy of CeraVe
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From ushering new life into the world to holding the hand of a patient as they take their last breath, nurses are everyday heroes that deserve our respect and appreciation.

To give back to this community that is always giving so selflessly to others, CeraVe® put out a call to nurses to share their stories for a chance to be featured in Heroes Behind the Masks, a digital content series shining a light on nurses who go above and beyond to provide safe and quality care to patients and their communities.

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Tenesia | Heroes Behind the Masks presented by CeraVe www.youtube.com

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via The Walt Disney Company / Flickr

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Courtesy of CeraVe
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"I love being a nurse because I have the honor of connecting with my patients during some of their best and some of their worst days and making a difference in their lives is among the most rewarding things that I can do in my own life" - Tenesia Richards, RN

From ushering new life into the world to holding the hand of a patient as they take their last breath, nurses are everyday heroes that deserve our respect and appreciation.

To give back to this community that is always giving so selflessly to others, CeraVe® put out a call to nurses to share their stories for a chance to be featured in Heroes Behind the Masks, a digital content series shining a light on nurses who go above and beyond to provide safe and quality care to patients and their communities.

First up: Tenesia Richards, a labor and delivery nurse working in New York City who, in addition to her regular job, started a community outreach program in a homeless shelter that houses expectant mothers for up to one year postpartum.

Tenesia | Heroes Behind the Masks presented by CeraVe www.youtube.com

Upon learning at a conference that black mothers in the U.S. die at three to four times the rate of white mothers, one of the widest of all racial disparities in women's health, Richards decided to take further action to help her community. She, along with a handful of fellow nurses, volunteered to provide antepartum, childbirth and postpartum education to the women living at the shelter. Additionally, they looked for other ways to boost the spirits of the residents, like throwing baby showers and bringing in guest speakers. When COVID-19 hit and in-person gatherings were no longer possible, Richards and her team found creative workarounds and created holiday care packages for the mothers instead.

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