Condom company Trojan ranked college campuses for student sexual health. So, who came out on top?

Trojan teamed up with Sperling's BestPlaces to find which ones are doing sexual health resources right.

Choosing a college is a tough decision.

There are so many factors to consider: location, student-faculty ratio, majors ... sexual health.

Well, the quality of sexual health resources isn't a category in the U.S. News and World Report college rankings, but it totally should be.


From consent to sexual violence, we've seen a serious uptick in public conversations about safe sex on campus. And the idea of young adults getting reliable health care and information? I think that's something we can all get behind.

So does Trojan. That's why they've been publishing a sexual health report card, grading U.S. colleges in 11 categories — including contraceptive availability, STI testing, and quality of online resources — for the past 10 years. And the 2015 results are in.

Here are the schools that came out on top:

1. Oregon State University

Photo by Kirt Edblom/Flickr.

OSU is valedictorian for the second year in a row after a surprising 25-slot rise from 2013 to 2014. The OSU Beavers excel when it comes to sexual health, getting perfect scores on an impressive 5 out of 11 categories, including sexual health website information quality, student peer groups programming, and contraceptive availability.

2. Stanford University

Photo by Anna Fox/Flickr.

Stanford is another recent up-and-comer. After taking #20 in 2013, it skyrocketed to #5 in 2014. There's no shortage of sexual health resources on campus. My favorite? The Sexual Health Peer Resource Center gives every undergrad $3 every quarter to go toward sexual health products. That's enough to cover 60 glow-in-the-dark condoms per year!

3. University of Georgia

Photo by David Torcivia/Flickr.

Georgia is one of 20 states that require comprehensive sex education and HIV education for schoolchildren. This state university continues that awesome trend of supporting safe and healthy sex. UGA Bulldogs can get free condoms, lube, and dental dams delivered right to their dorm doors, courtesy of the Condom Express program.

4. University of Michigan-Ann Arbor

Photo by Jason Crotty/Flickr.

Michigan Wolverines aren't just among the best in college sports. They're also at the top of their game when it comes to sexual health resources. Need to see a sex therapist? They've even got those on campus!

5. Brown University

Photo by John W. Schulze/Flickr.

The Bears at Brown know how to get down. Considering the stereotype that Brown students are more ... free-spirited, I'm not surprised they're the highest-ranking Ivy League school on this list. They offer a LOT of health education services, including peer-educator groups called SHAG (Sexual Health Awareness Group) and the Safer Sex Squad.

6. University of Oregon

Photo by Andre Chinn/Flickr.

Remember that movie "Animal House"? Yep. That was filmed on this campus. If that isn't reason enough for them to have amazing sexual health care, I don't know what is. Three cheers for a school that made an MTV-recommended app called SexPositive and offers free finger cots. Glad they delivered.

7. University of Iowa

Photo by Phil Roeder/Flickr.

It looks like the Hawkeyes like coming first: The school opened its doors just 59 days after Iowa officially became a state and has continued to be a trailblazer. It was the first American public university to go co-ed and to award law degrees to a woman and a black person. And thanks to some amazing protestors, the school's sexual assault policies are miles ahead of most colleges with their new affirmative consent policy.

8. Columbia University

Photo by InSapphoWeTrust/Flickr.

Columbia is home of one of my favorite health advice sites: Go Ask Alice! Initially made just for Columbia students, the website has gone on to win awards and is known for the handy guidance from experts in fields ranging from medicine and public health to health education. Kudos.

9. University of Texas-Austin

Photo by pyxopotamus/Flickr.

This flagship institution has a very active student body. In 2002, Sports Illustrated called it the country's best sports college. Athletes from this UT have raked in an impressive 130 Olympic medals. (Some from current students — talk about extracurriculars!) Fortunately for the student body, UT-Austin is among the best colleges if you're sexually active, too. The school boasts a 24/7 nurse advice line and offers Sexual Assault Forensic Exams on campus.

10. University of Arizona

Photo via Ken Lund/Wikimedia Commons.

The Wildcats have plenty to boast about. The college has a beautiful campus that features an arboretum. It's also home to resources such as gender-confirming health care coverage and a class where students hold a Condom Olympics. And that picturesque campus? It served as the backdrop for the movie "Eating Out."

Sadly, there's no lack of schools that need a lot of improvement. The probation list includes Seton Hall University at #128, Texas Tech at #134, and Brigham Young University, which came in dead last at #140.

While some schools need to step up, the good news is that Trojan's survey has shown an overall trend of improvement in college sexual health resources across the country.

Now that's something to get excited about.

If ya know what I mean. ;) GIF from "Arrested Development."

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Photo by Gregory Hayes on Unsplash

"Can I buy you a drink?" is a loaded question.

It could be an innocent request from someone who's interested in having a cordial conversation. Other time, saying "yes" means you may have to fend off someone who feels entitled to spend the rest of the night with you.

In the worst-case scenario, someone is trying to take advantage of you or has a roofie in their pocket.

Feminist blogger Jennifer Dziura found a fool-proof way to stay safe while understanding someone's intentions: ask for a non-alcoholic beverage or food. If they're sincerely interested in spending some time getting to know you, they won't mind buying something booze-free.

RELATED: States are starting to require mental health classes for all students. It's about dang time.

But if it's their intention to lower your defenses, they'll throw a mild tantrum after you refuse the booze. Her thoughts on the "Can I buy you a drink?" conundrum made their way to Tumblr.

via AshleysCo / Tumblr


via AshleysCo / Tumblr

The posts caught the attention of a bartender who knows there are lot of men out there whose sole intention is to get somone drunk to take advantage.

"Most of the time, when someone you don't know is buying you a drink, they're NOT doing it out of a sense of cordiality," the bartender wrote. "They're buying you a drink for the sole purpose of making you let your guard down."

So they shared a few tips on how to be safe and social when someone asks to buy you a drink.

From the other side of the bar, I see this crap all the time. Seriously. I work at a high-density bar, and let me tell you, I have anywhere from 10-20 guys every night come up and tell me to, "serve her a stronger drink, I'm trying to get lucky tonight, know what I mean?" usually accompanied with a wink and a gesture at a girl who, in my experience, is going to go from mildly buzzed to definitively hammered if I keep serving her. Now, I like to think I'm a responsible bartender, so I usually tell guys like that to piss off, and, if I can, try to tell the girl's more sober friends that they need to keep an eye on her.
But everyone- just so you know, most of the time, when someone you don't know is buying you a drink, they're NOT doing it out of a sense of cordiality, they're buying you a drink for the sole purpose of making you let your guard down.

Tips for getting drinks-

1. ALWAYS GO TO THE BAR TO GET YOUR OWN DRINK, DO NOT LET STRANGERS CARRY YOUR DRINKS. This is an opportune time for dropping something into your cocktail, and you're none the wiser.

2.IF YOU ORDER SOMETHING NON-ALCOHOLIC, I promise you, the bartender doesn't give two shits that you're not drinking cocktails with your friends, and often, totally understands that you don't want to let your guard down around strangers. Usually, you can just tell the bartender that you'd like something light, and that's a big clue to us that you're uncomfortable with whomever you're standing next to. Again, we see this all the time.

3. If you're in a position to where you feel uncomfortable not ordering alcohol:
Here's a list of light liquors, and mixers that won't get you drunk, and will still look like an actual cocktail:

X-rated + sprite = easy to drink, sweet, and 12% alcoholic content. Not strong at all, usually runs $6-$8, depending on your state.
Amaretto + sour= sweet, not strong, 26%.
Peach Schnapps+ ginger ale= tastes like mellow butterscotch, 24%.
Melon liquor (Midori, in most bars) + soda water = not overly sweet, 21%
Coffee liquor (Kahlua) +soda = not super sweet, 20%.
Hope this helps someone out!

RELATED: Permit denied for 'straight pride' parade in California

If you do accept a drink from someone at a bar and you want to talk, there's no need to feel obligated to spend the rest of the night with them.

Jaqueline Whitmore, founder of The Protocol School of Palm Beach, says to be polite you only have to "Engage in some friendly chit-chat, but you are not obligated to do more than that."

If someone asks to buy you a drink and you don't want it, Whitmore has a great tip. "Say thank you, but you are trying to cut back, have to drive or you don't accept drinks from strangers," Whitmore says.

What if they've already sent the drink over? "Give the drink to the bartender and tell him or her to enjoy it," Whitmore says.

Have fun. Stay safe, and make sure to bring a great wing-man or wing-woman with you.

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