More

An Artist Takes Bits And Pieces Of Hate And Turns Them Into Something Beautiful

It's like a Monet painting, except ladies are with ladies and the lawn is made of hate speech. I bet if the guy holding an anti-gay sign thought he'd show up on the left arm of this child of a lesbian couple, he'd be freaking out. Same goes for the 20 bad-voting politicians floating above the head of the woman on the left. Zoom in and see how hate (and other expressions) get converted to beauty.

An Artist Takes Bits And Pieces Of Hate And Turns Them Into Something Beautiful



Artist's statement: "I used all sorts of scraps from photos, magazine articles, aspects of good and bad and real life, to assemble the image on canvas. The artwork is indeed personal — a portrait of my sister Emily, her wife Tiffany, at the park with their daughter, dressed in Superhero garb as usual. The title was inspired by a Neil Young song lyric."

Photo by Louis Hansel on Unsplash
True

This story was originally shared on Capital One.

Inside the walls of her kitchen at her childhood home in Guatemala, Evelyn Klohr, the founder of a Washington, D.C.-area bakery called Kakeshionista, was taught a lesson that remains central to her business operations today.

"Baking cakes gave me the confidence to believe in my own brand and now I put my heart into giving my customers something they'll enjoy eating," Klohr said.

While driven to launch her own baking business, pursuing a dream in the culinary arts was economically challenging for Klohr. In the United States, culinary schools can open doors to future careers, but the cost of entry can be upwards of $36,000 a year.

Through a friend, Klohr learned about La Cocina VA, a nonprofit dedicated to providing job training and entrepreneurship development services at a training facility in the Washington, D.C-area.

La Cocina VA's, which translates to "the kitchen" in Spanish, offers its Bilingual Culinary Training program to prepare low-and moderate-income individuals from diverse backgrounds to launch careers in the food industry.

That program gave Klohr the ability to fully immerse herself in the baking industry within a professional kitchen facility and receive training in an array of subjects including culinary skills, food safety, career development and English language classes.

Keep Reading Show less

A young boy tried to grab the Pope's skull cap

A boy of about 10-years-old with a mental disability stole the show at Pope Francis' weekly general audience on Wednesday at the Vatican auditorium. In front of an audience of thousands the boy walked past security and onto the stage while priests delivered prayers and introductory speeches.

The boy, later identified as Paolo, Jr., greeted the pope by shaking his hand and when it was clear that he had no intention of leaving, the pontiff asked Monsignor Leonardo Sapienza, the head of protocol, to let the boy borrow his chair.

The boy's activity on the stage was clearly a breach of Vatican protocol but Pope Francis didn't seem to be bothered one bit. He looked at the child with a sense of joy and wasn't even disturbed when he repeatedly motioned that he wanted to remove his skull cap.

Keep Reading Show less