You can have a real live llama or goat join your video calls because 2020 can't get any weirder

First the pandemic brought us the hilarious entertainment of "Potato Boss." Now we have people inviting farm animals to join corporate video conferences. Welcome to 2020, where literally anything is possible!

An animal sanctuary in the Silicon Valley came up with a clever way to make up for lost revenue during the country-wide shutdown. Sweet Farm launched a service last month that lets people pay to have one of their animals slide into their video calls, and frankly, it's genius. How much joy would you get seeing a llama's face alongside your coworkers during a video conference?


The best part? They call it Goat 2 Meeting—a play on the video conferencing software GoToMeeting.

The Goat 2 Meeting service is offered as either virtual tours or meeting cameos at several price points. Their website offers four options:

  • 20 minute Virtual Private Tour is a $65 donation for up to 6 people. This tour will highlight a few of our animal ambassadors and areas of the farm.
  • 10 minute Corporate Meeting Cameo is a $100 donation for unlimited guests. You send us your meeting link and we'll call in to bring some smiles to your co-workers faces!
  • 25 Min Corporate Meeting Virtual Tour is a $250 donation for unlimited guests. You send us your meeting link and we'll call in to show you and your co-workers around the farm!
  • 25 Min VIP Meeting is a $750 donation for unlimited guests. Due to incredible demand we've opened up some extra slots with one of our directors to give you a very special view of the farm.


Sweet Farms told Business Insider that they've fielded more than 300 requests since the service opened in mid-March. From Fortune 500 companies to tech startups to legal firms, people are taking advantage of the opportunity to bring farm animals into work meetings.

Just when we thought 2020 couldn't get any weirder.

"I think we're all a little stressed with what's going on — many of us have been sitting inside," Sweet Farm told Business Insider. "We're just hoping to bring some smiles to people's faces while bringing them out to the farm at the same time."

Sweet Farm is also offering free virtual fieldtrips to schools and non-profits.

If you want to request a Goat 2 Meeting, visit the Sweet Farms scheduler here.

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