Jane Goodall speaks some hard truths to the people of China about the Coronavirus

Jane Goodall has been a friend to primates for decades. Her conservation work has inspired and moved people of countless generations, cultures and background. And through it all she's so often a voice of warmth and compassion in the face of senseless violence, cruelty and tragedy.

In a new video, Goodall directly addresses the people of China who finally seem to be coming up for air, literally and figuratively, after suffering through the world's first COVID-19 outbreak. And as one might expect, her video begins with a sympathetic and warm message of hope."It is a truly terrible time you are going through," Goodall begins. "And my heart is with all who are sick, all who have lost loved ones. I just hope and pray that the nightmare will soon be over."



But as any honest observer knows, the "nightmare" never had to become a reality. And that's where Goodall speaks some hard truths to the people of China, and those around the world, about animal rights. As Goodall explains, animals welfare isn't just a nice thing to do. Reforming our relationship with the animal kingdom is essential for our own survival. Most of us are familiar with the risks posed by global climate change, extinction and the destruction of natural habitats and wildlife. But beyond our compassion, Goodall explains that there is a real risk to taking too much from the animals of the world, stating plainly: "Our too close relationship with animals in the markets, or when we use them for entertainment, has unleashed the terror and misery of new viruses. Viruses that exist within animals without harming them but mutate into other forms to infect us with diseases like Ebola, SARS, MERS and now, the Coronavirus."

Thank you Jane Goodall for showing that there's a way to be critical of practices in China (and around the globe) without being racist or xenophobic. As the coronavirus is showing us for better and for worse, we're all one connected world and we have to take care of each other and the animals that share the planet we call home.

Watch the whole thing below:


Video message from Jane Goodall on Covid-19 www.youtube.com


True
Frito-Lay

Did you know one in five families are unable to provide everyday essentials and food for their children? This summer was also the hungriest on record with one in four children not knowing where their next meal will come from – an increase from one in seven children prior to the pandemic. The effects of COVID-19 continue to be felt around the country and many people struggle to secure basic needs. Unemployment is at an all-time high and an alarming number of families face food insecurity, not only from the increased financial burdens but also because many students and families rely on schools for school meal programs and other daily essentials.

This school year is unlike any other. Frito-Lay knew the critical need to ensure children have enough food and resources to succeed. The company quickly pivoted to expand its partnership with Feed the Children, a leading nonprofit focused on alleviating childhood hunger, to create the "Building the Future Together" program to provide shelf-stable food to supplement more than a quarter-million meals and distribute 500,000 pantry staples, school supplies, snacks, books, hand sanitizer, and personal care items to schools in underserved communities.

Keep Reading Show less
Canva

I got married and started working in my early 20s, and for more than two decades I always had employer-provided health insurance. When the Affordable Care Act (ACA, aka "Obamacare")was passed, I didn't give it a whole lot of thought. I was glad it helped others, but I just assumed my husband or I would always be employed and wouldn't need it.

Then, last summer, we found ourselves in an unexpected scenario. I was working as a freelance writer with regular contract work and my husband left his job to manage our short-term rentals and do part-time contracting work. We both had incomes, but for the first time, no employer-provided insurance. His previous employer offered COBRA coverage, of course, but it was crazy expensive. It made far more sense to go straight to the ACA Marketplace, since that's what we'd have done once COBRA ran out anyway.

The process of getting our ACA healthcare plan set up was a nightmare, but I'm so very thankful for it.

Let me start by saying I live in a state that is friendly to the ACA and that adopted and implemented the Medicaid expansion. I am also a college-educated and a native English speaker with plenty of adult paperwork experience. But the process of getting set up on my state's marketplace was the most confusing, frustrating experience I've ever had signing up for anything, ever.

Keep Reading Show less
True

$200 billion of COVID-19 recovery funding is being used to bail out fossil fuel companies. These mayors are combatting this and instead investing in green jobs and a just recovery.

Learn more on how cities are taking action: c40.org/divest-invest


It sounds like a ridiculous, sensationalist headline, but it's real. In Cheshire County, New Hampshire, a transsexual, anarchist Satanist has won the GOP nomination for county sheriff. Aria DiMezzo, who refers to herself as a "She-Male" and whose campaign motto was "F*** the Police," ran as a Republican in the primary. Though she ran unopposed on the ballot, according to Fox News, she anticipated that she would lose to a write-in candidate. Instead, 4,211 voters filled in the bubble next to her name, making her the official Republican candidate for county sheriff.

DiMezzo is clear about why she ran—to show how "clueless the average voter is" and to prove that "the system is utterly and hopelessly broken"—stances that her win only serves to reinforce.

In a blog post published on Friday, DiMezzo explained how she had never tried to hide who she was and that anyone could have looked her up to see what she was about, in addition to pointing out that those who are angry with her have no one to blame but themselves:

Keep Reading Show less
via Lorie Shaull / Flickr

The epidemic of violence against Indigenous women in America is one of the country's most disturbing trends. A major reason it persists is because it's rarely discussed outside of the native community.

According to the Centers for Disease Control, murder is the third-leading cause of death among American Indian and Alaska Native women under age 19.

Women who live on some reservations face rates of violence that are as much as ten times higher than the national average.

Keep Reading Show less