Like a modern-day Mr. Rogers, legendary sportscaster Vin Scully shared some encouraging words during the pandemic
via The Los Angeles Times / YouTube

In his 67 years as the play-by-play announcer for the Brooklyn / Los Angeles Dodgers, Vin Scully, 92, was known for his poetic turn-of-phrase in the broadcaster booth. He has a special knack for weaving in historical anecdotes and folksy wisdom in between balls and strikes.

Scully is not only revered for being the greatest baseball announcer ever, but he's also grandfatherly figure to the countless people who've grown up listening to his soothing voice that's synonymous with summer days.


To help soothe his soul and that of his readers, Los Angeles Times sports columnist Bill Plaschke called Scully to get his perspective on the coronavirus.

"He reminds us that this country has endured and triumphed over great troubles," Plaschke wrote. "He knows from personal experience. Born in 1927 and growing up during the Great Depression, he has been part of that journey."

Scully picked up the phone.

Scully compared the moment we're living in to others he's experienced over his long life.

"From depths of depression we fought our way through World War II, and if we can do that, we can certainly fight through this. I remember how happy and relieved and thrilled everybody was," Scully said.

"It's the life of the world, the ups and downs, this is a down, we're going to have to realistically accept it at what it is and we'll get out of it, that's all there is to it, we will definitely get out of it," he continued.

The eternal optimist, he prefers to focus on the positive side of things.

"A lot of people will look at it, it might bring them closer to their faith, they might pray a little harder, a little longer, there might be other good things to come out of it," he said.

"And certainly, I think people are especially jumping at the opportunity to help each other, I believe that's true, so that's kind of heartwarming, with all of it, it brings out some goodness in people, and that's terrific, that's terrific," he added.

But he still misses being close with his family during these hard times. "It's a very difficult time to go without hugs," he said.

But Scully looks forward to the future when all of this is behind us and the boys of summer can once again throw on their caps and run onto the field at Dodger Stadium.

"That will be so wonderful," he says, "that will be a rainbow after the storm, that, yeah, things are going to get better."

Although he's been retired for the past three seasons, there's no doubt Scully will be there for opening day, letting everyone know that "It's time for Dodgers baseball," once again.










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When Molly Reeser was a student at Michigan State University, she took a job mucking horse stalls to help pay for classes. While she was there, she met a 10-year-old girl named Casey, who was being treated for cancer, and — because both were animal lovers — they became fast friends.

Two years later, Casey died of cancer.

"Everyone at the barn wanted to do something to honor her memory," Molly remembers. A lot of suggestions were thrown out, but Molly knew that there was a bigger, more enduring way to do it.

"I saw firsthand how horses helped Casey and her family escape from the difficult and terrifying times they were enduring. I knew that there must be other families who could benefit from horses in the way she and her family had."

Molly approached the barn owners and asked if they would be open to letting her hold a one-day event. She wanted to bring pediatric cancer patients to the farm, where they could enjoy the horses and peaceful setting. They agreed, and with the help of her closest friends and the "emergency" credit card her parents had given her, Molly created her first Camp Casey. She worked with the local hospital where Casey had been a patient and invited 20 patients, their siblings and their parents.

The event was a huge success — and it was originally meant to be just that: a one-day thing. But, Molly says, "I believe Casey had other plans."

One week after the event, Molly received a letter from a five-year-old boy who had brain cancer. He had been at Camp Casey and said it was "the best day of his life."

"[After that], I knew that we had to pull it off again," Molly says. And they did. Every month for the next few years, they threw a Camp Casey. And when Molly graduated, she did the most terrifying thing she had ever done and told her parents that she would be waitressing for a year to see if it might be possible to turn Camp Casey into an actual nonprofit organization. That year of waitressing turned into six, but in the end she was able to pull it off: by 2010, Camp Casey became a non-profit with a paid staff.

"I am grateful for all the ways I've experienced good luck in my life and, therefore, I believe I have a responsibility to give back. It brings me tremendous joy to see people, animals, or things coming together to create goodness in a world that can often be filled with hardships."

Camp Casey serves 1500 children under the age of 18 each year in Michigan. "The organization looks different than when it started," Molly says. "We now operate four cost-free programs that bring accessible horseback riding and recreational services to children with cancer, sickle cell disease, and other life-threatening illnesses."

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