Grocery worker literally dances his way through a 'Karen' protesting store's mask policy

The coronavirus pandemic has brought all kinds of humans out of the woodwork, from silly dinosaur dads to kooky conspiracy theorists. A new viral video reveals how differently some people are handling our strange new reality—from a disgruntled customer who refuses to follow a supermarket's mask-wearing policy to a delightfully unfazed employee dancing while he disinfects the grocery carts.

Shelley Lewis shared a video she filmed after she was told that all customers and employees had to wear a masks to enter a Gelson's grocery store in Dana Point, California. Lewis—who is listed as a speaker at the 2019 Flat Earth International conference (ahem)—clearly saw herself as the hero of the story, a victim being discriminated against due to her undisclosed medical condition that precludes her from wearing a mask. But the real hero is the upbeat, unassuming grocery store employee who "absolutely and humbly" retrieved a manager for Lewis then continued dancing away while cleaning carts outside the store.


It's a joy to behold, truly. The store clerk, who normally works as a bartender, is so happy to have a job. He's happy to be of service. He happily goes about his work while wearing a mask—which none of us love, but understand is important for protecting others—and doesn't let this woman's antics get under his skin.

The store manager also stayed cool, calm and collected as Lewis went through her litany of complaints. When he explained the store's mask policy, she told him she has a medical condition and couldn't wear a mask. (If true, maybe you should do your grocery shopping online instead). When the manager offered to shop for her, she told him that she had "private things" to buy. (Ummm... you know everyone can see what you put in your grocery cart when you shop, right?). She was also incredulous about the idea of handing him her "private credit card" to take into the store to process. (Have you really never handed over your credit card through a drive-thru window, Shelley?!)

While much has been made of Lewis's attempt at victimization—the best part of this story is how the Gelson's employee with the shades and the unflappable sunny attitude handled this whole situation. She even asked him why he was so happy, as if everyone should be throwing a fit outside the store over having to wear a mask. He never said anything disparaging. In fact, he maintained an impressive level of respect and positivity throughout the video.

If he had read her Flat Earth International bio, he would have seen that she claims to have lupus, which is an autoimmune disease, which increases her risk of complications from COVID-19. If he had known that, he may have kindly pointed out that everyone there was wearing a mask to protect people like her.

This is what an everyday hero looks like right now—a guy enjoying his day job, doing what needs to be done to protect the public he's serving and entertaining himself and others in the face of abject ignorance. He is the hero we all need.

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If someone were to say "video games" to you, what are the first words that come to mind? Whatever words you thought of (fun, exciting, etc.), we're willing to guess "healthy" or "mental health tool" didn't pop into your mind.

And yet… it turns out they are. Especially for Veterans.

How? Well, for one thing, video games — and virtual reality more generally — are also more accessible and less stigmatized to veterans than mental health treatment. In fact, some psychiatrists are using virtual reality systems for this reason to treat PTSD.

Secondly, video games allow people to socialize in new ways with people who share common interests and goals. And for Veterans, many of whom leave the military feeling isolated or lonely after they lose the daily camaraderie of their regiment, that socialization is critical to their mental health. It gives them a virtual group of friends to talk with, connect to, and relate to through shared goals and interests.

In addition, according to a 2018 study, since many video games simulate real-life situations they encountered during their service, it makes socialization easier since they can relate to and find common ground with other gamers while playing.

This can help ease symptoms of depression, anxiety, and even PTSD in Veterans, which affects 20% of the Veterans who have served since 9/11.

Watch here as Verizon dives into the stories of three Veteran gamers to learn how video games helped them build community, deal with trauma and have some fun.

Band of Gamers www.youtube.com

Video games have been especially beneficial to Veterans since the beginning of the pandemic when all of us — Veterans included — have been even more isolated than ever before.

And that's why Verizon launched a challenge last year, which saw $30,000 donated to four military charities.

And this year, they're going even bigger by launching a new World of Warships charity tournament in partnership with Wargaming and Wounded Warrior Project called "Verizon Warrior Series." During the tournament, gamers will be able to interact with the game's iconic ships in new and exciting ways, all while giving back.

Together with these nonprofits, the tournament will welcome teams all across the nation in order to raise money for military charities helping Veterans in need. There will be a $100,000 prize pool donated to these charities, as well as donation drives for injured Veterans at every match during the tournament to raise extra funds.

Verizon is also providing special discounts to Those Who Serve communities, including military and first responders, and they're offering a $75 in-game content military promo for World of Warships.

Tournament finals are scheduled for August 8, so be sure to tune in to the tournament and donate if you can in order to give back to Veterans in need.

Courtesy of Verizon

via CNN / Twitter

Eviction seemed imminent for Dasha Kelly, 32, and her three young daughters Sharron, 8; Kia, 6; and Imani, 5, on Monday. The eviction moratorium expired over the weekend and it looked like there was no way for them to avoid becoming homeless.

The former Las Vegas card dealer lost her job due to casino closures during the pandemic and needed $2,000 to cover her back rent. The mother of three couldn't bear the thought of being put out of her apartment with three children in the scorching Nevada desert.

"I had no idea what we were going to do," Kelly said, according to KOAT.

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