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The international flag of Earth is kind of a big deal. Here's why.

It's a pretty nifty start to world peace, I think. What do you think?

FYI: A designer in Sweden has made us all a flag for Earth. An Earth flag!


Images and GIFs via The International Flag of Planet Earth.


It's made specifically to look awesome in space.

And on your street. But also ... SPACE.

It's bright blue, like water.


It's not light blue, not dark blue...

...but a special blue to stand out against the black of space and the shiny white-ness of space suits.

Because, obviously, spacemen and spacewomen will be sporting this flag!

It has interconnected circles.

By itself, a circle is just a circle. But when many circles comes together, they make a beautiful flower.

What does all that design-talk mean?

It can be easy to feel insignificant when you contemplate the vastness of Earth and all our differences, problems, people, and things. But really, we should feel SO unique and rare and important!

We Earthlings are all these circles, and when we come together, we make something beautiful.

That's why I'm into this.

The international flag of Earth might be the very first flag we have that doesn't pit any of us against each other.

A flag that doesn't mean US versus THEM, but a flag that's a pure celebration of us.

Earthlings. Together.

Here's a beautiful short video about how the flag was designed. It's kinda hypnotizing.

[vimeo_embed https://player.vimeo.com/video/127694736?title=0&byline=0&portrait=0 expand=1]

Be careful! Too much thinking about this flag might hypnotize you into feeling very united with everyone on Earth. Who KNOWS what that might cause.

via UNSW

This article originally appeared on 07.10.21


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