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Richard and Didi Dobbs didn't know much about Down syndrome when their nephew Sean was born with the condition in 1985.

The only thing they did know — and according to all of the information they could find on the condition — was that it was synonymous with "Mongolism." Which, as you can imagine, was less than reassuring.

"It was the '80s, and there was no Internet or anything," Didi told Upworthy. "I knew the very little that people in the '60s would know, which is that it was odd, or freaky, or scary."


Before the '80s, the average life expectancy for a person with Down syndrome was 28 years, and it was common for children born with the condition to be sent away and raised in institutions or group homes, segregated from educational opportunities and the public at large. In fact, up until 1984 — just a year before Sean was born — doctors were not legally required to give medically indicated treatment for life-threatening conditions to infants with disabilities.


Sean as a toddler. All GIFs via Richard Dobbs/Vimeo.

So the Dobbses tried to help their family, and others like them, the only way that they knew how: by turning the cameras on.

When Sean was 2 years old, they began to film his life with the ultimate goal of turning the footage into an informational video to help other families treading the then-uncharted waters of raising a child with Down syndrome. At the time, no such movies existed, at least not that they could find.

Over the years, they documented all the major milestones in Sean’s life. They filmed his speech and occupational therapy classes as he learned to walk and talk. When he took a liking to swimming, they brought their camera along to his high school swim meets. They followed him to the prom and to his high school graduation, when he became the first special needs student in the 2,000-person school to graduate on time.

Sean shaving before the prom.

Their archival footage was interesting to family and friends, but it wasn't really a story ... until they learned that Sean was going to compete in the National Special Olympics Triathlon in 2014.

Suddenly, the film that had been nearly 30 years in the making had a whole new shape as well as a name: "Sean So Far."

The Dobbses began to chronicle Sean's preparation alongside his triathlon partner, Troy — the only two athletes from Connecticut to compete in the national games that year. Their friendship would go on to become one of the lynchpins of the film.

Sean and Troy training together.

But the film took another unexpected turn when Sean was rushed into emergency spinal surgery six months before his big race.

During an obligatory physical, doctors discovered an atlantoaxial instability in Sean’s neck. This is a fairly common congenital complication in people with Down syndrome, although that doesn't make it any less serious.

Sean ended up missing eight weeks of training that winter while he recovered from the surgery. But as soon as the neck brace was gone and the doctors gave the word, he was right back at it, determined to get himself back into shape before the race.

Sean ended up taking home the bronze medal at the National Special Olympics that year, but his story didn't stop there.

Just two weeks after the race, Sean and Troy were invited to attend a black-tie dinner at the White House on behalf of the Special Olympics International Committee.

Sean was even given the opportunity to deliver a speech to President Barack Obama and his family. "His mouth had no muscle tone when he was a baby — we have footage of that — so this speech was a big deal!" Didi Dobbs said.

Sean meeting President Obama.

The Dobbses have seen a lot of changes in the 30 years that they've been working on "Sean So Far" — both in Sean himself and in the way the world looks at Down syndrome.

Didi recalled seeing a child with Down syndrome in a recent commercial for Target and noted how that kind of visibility goes a long way to normalizing the condition and building empathy for people with it. After all, that's how Sean has been able to do so many amazing things: by thinking that he could and having a family who supported that.

"Sean learned that everything is possible, not that he has limits," Didi said. "He knows he has Down syndrome, and he talks about it. Yes, it's a disability. But I heard someone refer to it as 'life in a different key.' And that's how I've come to see it."

Sean being interviewed about self-respect for the documentary.

As for Sean himself? He’s returned to his day job, enjoying some much-needed downtime.

2014 was a whirlwind of excitement, so he's taking some time to hang out with friends, go to the gym, and catch up on his favorite TV shows and hobbies.

You know, like people normally do.

Check out the trailer for "Sean So Far" below:


Images provided by Pacifico

Making waves in the best way

True

At last, summer is here. And for many people, that means it's time for heading to the beach and maybe even catching some waves. Surfing is a quintessential summertime activity for those who live in coastal communities—it’s not only really fun and challenging, it’s also a great way to celebrate Mother Nature’s beauty. Even after a wipeout, the cool water mixed with warm sunshine offers a certain kind of euphoria. Or, you know, just hanging back on the sand is plenty fun too. Simply being outdoors near the ocean is its own reward.

pacifico quiksilver beach cleanupLet’s protect the places where outdoor adventure happensAll photos provided by Pacifico

However, it's well known that our beautiful beaches are suffering the consequences of overcrowding, pollution and littering. What was once a way of playing in nature is now slowly destroying it. And of course, this affects beachgoers everywhere. The sad truth is—without taking action to preserve all the natural joys the earth provides, we will eventually lose them.

But there is hope. Two popular brands that both have roots in surf culture have teamed up to help make trips to the beach a more sustainable pastime. The best part? You don’t have to know how to hang ten in order to participate.

Pacifico®, a pilsner-style lager originally brought to the U.S. by surfers, and Quiksilver, an iconic apparel company loved by both surfers and beach goers alike, have created a brand-new range of clothing and accessories with sustainability in mind.

Take a look below. These threads are great for all kinds of fun in the sun, without compromising the environment.

pacifico quicksilver beach cleanupsReady to make some waves

The collection launches on July 5 and includes tees and woven shirts, boardshorts, hats, flip-flops and a special beach towel and tote bag. The unique collaboration features the vibrant, colorful designs that are the hallmark of Quiksilver combined with Pacifico elements, created to make a positive impact.

Each item has been thoughtfully curated to minimize an environmental footprint and protect the outdoors. The hats, for example, are made from NetPlus® by Bureo®, a raw material created from South American recycled fishing nets. Additionally, the board shorts are made from recycled plastic bottles, and tees are made with 100% organic cotton. Pretty rad stuff, to put it in surfer lingo.

The prices on these pieces are equally rad, ranging from $28 flip-flops to $60 boardshorts.

In keeping with the sustainable ethos and protecting the places we play, Pacifico and Quiksilver will celebrate the products’ launch by hosting two beach cleanups. The first is on July 5 at Sunset Point in Malibu, California, from 4-5:30pm, and the second is on July 9th at Deerfield Beach in Florida from 8:30 – 10:30am.

pacifico quicksilver clothing lineCleaning up and looking good while doing it

Theses beach cleanups are open to anyone over the age of 21 who’s ready to have some fun while taking care of nature’s playground.

Those who can’t make it to the beach (bummer, dude) don’t have to miss out on all the fun. The new collection will be available on July 5th at www.quiksilver.com/mens-collab-pacifico. And even if you don’t surf, never plan to surf, have no desire to even be near a surfboard, rest assured, the apparel is still cool. Plus sustainable choices are always good fashion.

Our planet provides us with an endless supply of beauty and adventure. But without more mindful actions from humanity, its natural wonders will eventually diminish. Fortunately Pacifico and Quiksilver are making it easier than ever for people to enjoy the great outdoors without jeopardizing it. That’s a wave worth riding.

Paul Rudd in 2016.

Passing around your yearbook to have it signed by friends, teachers and classmates is a fun rite of passage for kids in junior high and high school. But, according to KDVR, for Brody Ridder, a bullied sixth grader at The Academy of Charter Schools in Westminster, Colorado, it was just another day of putting up with rejection.

Poor Brody was only able to get four signatures in his yearbook, two from what appeared to be teachers and one from himself that said, “Hope you make some more friends."

Brody’s mom, Cassandra Ridder has been devastated by the bullying her son has faced over the past two years. "There [are] kids that have pushed him and called him names," she told The Washington Post. It has to be terrible to have your child be bullied and there is nothing you can do.

She posted about the incident on Facebook.

“My poor son. Doesn’t seem like it’s getting any better. 2 teachers and a total of 2 students wrote in his yearbook,” she posted on Facebook. “Despite Brody asking all kinds of kids to sign it. So Brody took it upon himself to write to himself. My heart is shattered. Teach your kids kindness.”

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This article originally appeared on 09.06.17


Being married is like being half of a two-headed monster. It's impossible to avoid regular disagreements when you're bound to another person for the rest of your life. Even the perfect marriage (if there was such a thing) would have its daily frustrations. Funnily enough, most fights aren't caused by big decisions but the simple, day-to-day questions, such as "What do you want for dinner?"; "Are we free Friday night?"; and "What movie do you want to see?"

Here are some hilarious tweets that just about every married couple will understand.

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