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Pop Culture

John Stamos shares parenting advice given by Bob Saget and parents can relate

Sometimes a laugh is all you need.

John Stamos; Bob Saget; parenting; parenting advice; new parent; new dad
John Stamos via Wikicommons, Bob Saget via Wikicommons

John Stamos shares parenting advice from Bob Saget.

When a baby is born, most people expect that parents will immediately connect with the new infant, but that's not always the case. Of course, there are parents that feel an instant love and deep connection with their brand new baby and that's normal.

John Stamos recalled a conversation with his late friend Bob Saget about this very thing. Stamos became a dad at the age of 54 and confided in his friend about not feeling connected to his son, and Saget gave him a small gem of wisdom to hold onto.

In the caption of a sweet video of Stamos pretending to sneeze into tissues while holding his son, he wrote, "For the first few months I didn’t feel as connected with my son as I thought I would. Bob Saget said just wait until the first time he laughs at you." Stamos continued, "If this doesn’t cheer you up on a Wednesday, nothing will."


The video was full of pure joy from his son. Every time Stamos "sneezed," his son, who looks to be under a year in the clip, laughs hysterically. There's something about a baby's laugh that gets many people smiling, but it's the human admission in the caption that's resonating with some parents.

Connecting isn't always instant and for a celebrity like Stamos to casually mention his struggles with bonding with his child it can help others struggling feel less ashamed to admit their own feelings. It can seem that immediate bonding is the norm, and people may be surprised to know not everyone feels that way.

In fact, connecting or not connecting with a newborn are both normal reactions to bringing a baby home. Dr. Dotun Ogunyemi tells the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists that bonding occurs during the first year of an infant's life and not having feelings of closeness within the first few weeks is normal.

Flying House Threads also commented on the relatable post saying, "Honestly I felt the same way. Bob was right though. The first time my son looked at me and laughed like I was the funniest person in the world it melted my heart. Thank you for being so open and honest on here."

Hayley Stewart wrote, "Sometimes connections take time. When my daughter was born it wasn't instantaneous either. ❤️ and now she's all I can think about! She goes to sleep and I look at pictures of her on my phone because I miss her even tho she's in the other room haha parenthood hits everyone differently. Love this sweet video ❤️"

Man's hand with gold wedding band holding a newborn baby's head.Photo by Kelly Sikkema on Unsplash

The comments were full of support from other parents and people thanking Stamos for the video. Shannon Meuse wrote, "My daughter is 31 and I still remember the first time she laughed. She was 4 months old. I cried laughing. This video is pure joy ♥️"

No one can predict how they will respond emotionally when their newborn enters the world, but as long as parents keep being honest about their feelings then fewer new parents will feel alone. The old adage that it takes a village remains true. Our village may look just a little different nowadays.

Our home, from space.

Sixty-one years ago, Yuri Gagarin became the first human to make it into space and probably the first to experience what scientists now call the "overview effect." This change occurs when people see the world from far above and notice that it’s a place where “borders are invisible, where racial, religious and economic strife are nowhere to be seen.”

The overview effect makes man’s squabbles with one another seem incredibly petty and presents the planet as it truly is, one interconnected organism.

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Health

Here’s how we can use the power of awe to make our lives more fulfilling

Being amazed by things outside ourselves is tremendous for our mental health.

A young man looking into the sky

The exhilaration of a rock concert. The feeling of deep serenity you experience during a religious ceremony. That sense of connectedness you get while walking through a dense forest. The lightness that flows through your body while dancing and the dissolution of the ego you experience on psychedelics. These are all experiences that give us the feeling of awe.

Most of us love having at least a few of these experiences and believe they help us grow. But now, a team of psychologists has explained why cultivating a sense of awe can benefit our minds and bodies and how we can create these experiences ourselves.

Maria Monroy and Dacher Keltner posit that a sense of awe can help solve the crises of individualism, excessive self-focus, loneliness and a culture of cynicism, and can even improve our physical health. They explain it in a research article titled “Awe as a Pathway to Mental and Physical Health.”

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@allbelongco/TikTok

How bizarre, how bizarre.

It should go without saying that it’s not cool to steal from your Airbnb. But that doesn’t mean it doesn’t still happen.

However, when one Airbnb host recently discovered a guest had—for some strange reason—stolen one of her paintings, then replaced it with a completely different painting, she decided to make the best out of a very uncool situation by sharing the story on TikTok.

As a result, viewers got to witness an continuously unraveling, truly bizarre modern-day art heist.

Okay, let’s get into it.

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Pop Culture

Woman flawlessly breaks down how luxury bags—and other designer brands—keep people 'poor'

"They're targeting the people who want to look rich—middle and lower class folks who don't have a lot of money or savings. That is the bread and butter of designer brands."

Cara Nicole/Youtube

Not worth it.

It feels safe to say that we are all hoping to be more mindful about how we spend our money these days, whether it’s to be kinder to the environment, align better with our values, improve our finances or simply exercise free will against the siren call of consumerism.

That’s why this video essay created by Cara Nicole (who gives all kinds of financials and sustainability education on her Youtube channel) feels so timely.

In just under twenty minutes, Nicole astutely breaks down how luxury brands like Hermes, Louis Vuitton and Rolex create the fake illusion of wealth through “manufactured exclusivity” and getting free marketing from celebrities and influencers—who often don’t even pay for the products themselves. Meanwhile, most real rich people wouldn’t be caught dead in the flashy brands, and in reality consider them "overrated." But still, the illusion persists. Because advertising.

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@keepingalfoatwiththejoneses/Instagram

Inexpensive and tranquil…what's not to like?

Saving money and living comfortably don’t always go hand in hand, but people do find ways to accomplish it. Sometimes all it takes is thinking a little outside the box—getting a job that allows you to travel the world or swapping out a traditional mortgage for more creative, less costly home ideas.

Take this couple in North Carolina, for example, who gave up living on land to move into a floating cabin and apparently saved $27,500 annually by doing so.

According to Good News Network, Sarah Spiro, 27, and her boyfriend, Brandon Jones, 40, break down the math: Their one-bedroom floating home, which they bought in March 2021, originally cost less than $30,000. The pair then spent two months and $23,000 renovating, for a total initial investment of less than $50,000. And now, they pay $2,500 a year to live on the lake. Yes, you read that right. $2,500 a year. They used to pay that much per month on their combined individual rents.

Obviously, it was a “no brainer,” said Spiro.

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@katherout/TikTok

Just another unsolved mystery

Who doesn’t like a good mystery?

A video creator known as @katherout certainly does. At the gym Kath frequents, there’s a whiteboard with a revolving prompt with simple questions like “What are you listening to?” or “What city were you born in?” Gym goers then write their responses anonymously on the board.

Kath recently became enthralled—and tickled—by a person who somehow manage to write the word “monke” (as in the word describing a group of monkeys, apparently) on every single one of their answers.

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