Why are good dads so likable? It's probably for these 5 simple reasons.

It's no secret that everybody loves good moms.

I know I do.

My wife is an amazing mom, and my kids love her to pieces.


I'm a grown man, and my own mama is still one of my favorite people on the planet due to all the love she provided and sacrifices she made to get me and my brothers to where we are today.

Identical twins giving our mama some identical holiday love. Photo provided by me.

But you know what? Everybody loves good dads, too. Their partners find them to be sexy, their friends enjoy being around them, and most importantly — their kids absolutely cannot get enough of them.

Why? Well, it's not only because they aren't interested in spending a random Tuesday night doing this.

Most good dads I know aren't making it rain at the club instead of being with their families. GIF from "Parks and Recreation."

Here are five simple reasons why good dads are so adored by their loved ones.

1. They love to wear their babies.

You don't have to wear babies to be a good dad, but good dads aren't afraid to try. Other than understanding that it's great for the baby's development, it's a beautiful thing to see a big strong man take part in a gentle act like strapping an infant to his chest. Not to mention, men who are willing to do this show their confidence, and most people I know love confident dudes.

These guys also aren't worried if Neanderthals laugh at them for using a baby carrier. They do it because they're demonstrating that building a bond with their babies is way more important than trying to impress the clowns who don't get it.

All photos are from Daddy Doin' Work Instagram, used with permission.

2. They're affectionate toward their children.

You know that "emotionally unavailable dad"? Sure you do. He's the guy who thinks he's an awesome father just because he brings home a paycheck. He never plays with his kids, he never tells them he loves them, and the only time he touches them is during a spanking when they "get out of line."

I'll go out on a limb here and say that nobody likes that dad.

But do you know the type of dads that everyone likes?

The dads who come home from work and instantly transitions into "play mode" (even without changing their clothes).

The dads who truly enjoy the bonding moments with their children.

The dads who hug and kiss their kids often.

It's a new world now and that emotionally unavailable nonsense is as played out as the Macarena and the Harlem Shake. Nowadays affection is the new toughness.

3. They aren't "too cool" to be a little silly.

The kids want to reenact a Disney movie scene? They're the first ones to set the stage.

Their daughters want a date for their tea parties? They're the first ones to put on dresses to own their fabulousness.

Good dads aren't "too cool" to do anything for their kids because they understand that making their kids happy is the coolest thing ever. Again, the level of confidence it takes to look silly and not care about anyone's opinion (other than his family, of course) is a great quality to have.

Not to mention, the silliest times always lead to the best memories.

4. If they're in romantic relationships, they choose to be parenting partners without being asked.

If the baby's crying in the middle of the night, they're the ones who quickly get up to tend to her so their partners can receive some much-needed rest.

And no, it doesn't matter to them if their spouses stay at home with the kids all day while they go to the office. These men are smart enough to know that they're both working and that everyone deserves a chance to enjoy a good night's sleep.

If they notice their partners are overwhelmed, they get busy in the kitchen to whip up a nice dinner for the family. Or, if they can't cook, they're thoughtful enough to bring home some take-out food instead.

Nobody asked them to do these things. They just do it because they're good people.

And that's what's up.

5. If they're in romantic relationships, they take the time to let their partners know that they're appreciated.

Newsflash: Raising kids is no joke. Between managing toddler tantrums, diaper changes, teenage hormones, and kids doing the complete opposite of what's asked of them, it can be a maddening and thankless gig at times.

But likable men are empathetic enough to know when their spouses need a pick-me-up. It doesn't take much, either. Just a simple, "You know what, honey? I appreciate everything you do for our family," and all of the stress seemingly disappears.

It takes so little effort to say thank you, but it has a ridiculously profound impact.

I'm sure it would have an even more profound impact if the Old Spice guy said it, but we don't need to go there. GIF from Old Spice.

In closing, I want to reiterate how awesome moms are.

Even though my dad is easily the best man I know, there's no chance I'd be the man and father I am today without my mom's guidance. But dads play an integral role in the parenting game too. The more involved we are, the better off it is for everyone.

Now if you'll excuse me, I need to put on my blonde Queen Elsa wig and sing "Let It Go" about a dozen times. Because, you know, fatherhood.

If you've never seen a Maori haka performed, you're missing out.

The Maori are the indigenous peoples of New Zealand, and their language and customs are an integral part of the island nation. One of the most recognizable Maori traditions outside of New Zealand is the haka, a ceremonial dance or challenge usually performed in a group. The haka represents the pride, strength, and unity of a tribe and is characterized by foot-stamping, body slapping, tongue protrusions, and rhythmic chanting.

Haka is performed at weddings as a sign of reverence and respect for the bride and groom and are also frequently seen before sports competitions, such as rugby matches.

Here's an example of a rugby haka:

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