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Pop Culture

Jennifer Garner calls her senator about gun safety all while making brownie oats

Jennifer Garner is the queen of wholesome advocacy. Long may she reign.

jennifer garner pretend baking show, jennifer garner brownie oats recipe

People love her Pretend Cooking Show on Instagram.

Jennifer Garner often serves up sweetness with her beloved Pretend Cooking Show on Instagram. But this time, she’s added her own special dash of simple activism into the mix.

The episode begins with all the playful, adorkable charm we’ve come to expect from Garner.

"You know when you need to be living life, but your heart isn't ready? Sometimes you just need a little comfort-something," the actress-slash-baker says in the opening as she prepares a brownie baked oatmeal recipe from Danielle Brown (@healthygirlkitchen).

"Like, I have on a dress and thought I was being fancy, but then I put sweatpants under it. So, pardon me," she quips while lifting up her skirt. This happens right before she realizes that “oh, shipoopi,” she needs more peanut butter. Yes, she used “shipoopi.” She’s delightful.

Once the ingredients are mixed and the 6 x 9 inch tray goes into the oven, there’s nothing left to do but wait for 40 minutes. Or as Garner puts it, “the perfect amount of time to make a call in support of gun safety bills.” Talk about multitasking.


As Garner talks on the phone, a script provided by journalist and former CNN Chief White House Correspondent Jessica Yellin shows up on the screen, which reads:

"Hello, I'm a constituent. I'd like to let the Senator know it is important to me that s/he votes for the gun safety reforms coming before Congress. You can then say why that matters to you, if you like.”

On her Instagram page, Yellin has also provided the U.S. Senate switchboard number: (202) 224-3121, along with specific GOP senators open to a compromise gun safety bill. You can also find your state senator's direct number at senate.gov.

Yellin’s post adds, “I don’t typically post content that advocates a specific action or guides you to lobby Congress,” but contends that “gun safety reform…is not a blue versus red issue. It’s a ‘get the people’s voices heard’ issue.”

Garner ends her video displaying what looks like a truly decadent dish, which seems to pass her taste test.

“In case you need a little comfort,” she says with a smile. Voila, delicious brownie oatmeal with a side of social justice. All part of a balanced breakfast.

One of Garner’s many, many lovely attributes is her penchant for easy acts of kindness. From making cookies for frontline workers to packing essentials in Ziploc bags for those in need, she shares ideas that practically anyone could do, celebrity or not. And—despite her own superstar status—she does it while staying down to earth. That’s almost as tricky a feat as baking the perfect brownie. But she nails it, and we love her for it.

It doesn’t take an A-lister to make a positive impact, but it's great when they use their celebrity for good. Sometimes big changes happen with small, even (brownie) bite-sized actions.

Albert Einstein

One of the strangest things about being human is that people of lesser intelligence tend to overestimate how smart they are and people who are highly intelligent tend to underestimate how smart they are.

This is called the Dunning-Kruger effect and it’s proven every time you log onto Facebook and see someone from high school who thinks they know more about vaccines than a doctor.

The interesting thing is that even though people are poor judges of their own smarts, we’ve evolved to be pretty good at judging the intelligence of others.

“Such findings imply that, in order to be adaptive, first impressions of personality or social characteristics should be accurate,” a study published in the journal Intelligence says. “There is accumulating evidence that this is indeed the case—at least to some extent—for traits such as intelligence extraversion, conscientiousness, openness, and narcissism, and even for characteristics such as sexual orientation, political ideology, or antigay prejudice.”

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