Watch an 87-yr-old Belgian man park his car in a garage with less than 3 inches to spare

Anyone who has ever parked in a downtown parking lot in a big city knows what a harrowing experience parking in a cramped parking space can be. I once parked in an underground grocery store parking lot in downtown L.A. and a stunning white Bentley convertible—a car that probably cost more than my house—squeezed into the spot next to me. After carefully opening my car door and maneuvering between our vehicles, I marveled at how close the driver had come to scratching his pearlescent white paint off the car and onto on a concrete column.

Either the driver was extremely skilled or extremely lucky. But he likely wasn't an expert a parker as 87-year-old Eugene Breynaert, a Belgian man who spent six decades parking his car in a garage barely wider than his vehicle.

With six centimeters of clearance—about 2.5 inches—you might wonder why he even bothered to use the garage at all, but Breynaert got it down to a science. First of all, he lined the garage with foam at the height of the car's widest spot. Second, he closed in his mirror. And finally, he took it really, really slowly.

While the parking itself is quite a feat to witness, what comes next is even more compelling. As the camera shows him pulling into this teeny garage, the question arises—how the heck does he get out?


It's hardly a process that can be described, but it involves rolling down a window, opening two doors, backing up, getting out, pushing the car forward from outside of it, then shutting the doors to both the car and the house.

You just have to see it:

Belgian man parks in garage 6cm wider than his car www.youtube.com

The video originally went viral back in 2010, but has resurfaced on Twitter and YouTube this week. It's hard to imagine a video about parking a car being so riveting, but strangely, it is. Maybe it's because so many people are bad at parking, or maybe it's because we never in a million years imagined a scenario like this one. Clearly, this space was not designed to be a garage for parking a car. A motorcycle, sure, but definitely not a car.

It appears Mr. Breynaert passed away in 2016 at the age of 94. The Belgian news announcement, which referred to him as "the best driver in all of Liedekerke" said that he continued driving right up until his last days.

Oddly enough, Breynaert's impressive parking job isn't the only viral parking story this week. Gareth Wild of the U.K. shared his meticulous process for tracking parking spots he's used at the local supermarket in an attempt to park in every spot, and people are enamored by it.

Perhaps it's his attention to detail and the amount of work he put into tracking how he parked his car, or perhaps people really are this bored during the pandemic, but Wild's thread has gotten wild attention.

This wasn't just a casual "Hey, I think I'll try to park in every space" kind of deal. He made vector images and color-coded the spaces.

He planned it all out mathematically.

It took him SIX YEARS, folks. But he managed to park in every space that he was legally allowed to park in.

He also went a step further and marked the best and worst parking spots for other people.

So many questions. How does a human being decide to do such a thing in the first place? What compels them to stick with it for six years? What of the 120,000 people who liked the thread on Twitter? Are they all equally fastidious data trackers, or are they not data people at all and are just amazed that someone would do this? Are there really this many parking enthusiasts in the world?

Apparently so. Who knew parking could be so compelling?

Photo by Louis Hansel on Unsplash
True

This story was originally shared on Capital One.

Inside the walls of her kitchen at her childhood home in Guatemala, Evelyn Klohr, the founder of a Washington, D.C.-area bakery called Kakeshionista, was taught a lesson that remains central to her business operations today.

"Baking cakes gave me the confidence to believe in my own brand and now I put my heart into giving my customers something they'll enjoy eating," Klohr said.

While driven to launch her own baking business, pursuing a dream in the culinary arts was economically challenging for Klohr. In the United States, culinary schools can open doors to future careers, but the cost of entry can be upwards of $36,000 a year.

Through a friend, Klohr learned about La Cocina VA, a nonprofit dedicated to providing job training and entrepreneurship development services at a training facility in the Washington, D.C-area.

La Cocina VA's, which translates to "the kitchen" in Spanish, offers its Bilingual Culinary Training program to prepare low-and moderate-income individuals from diverse backgrounds to launch careers in the food industry.

That program gave Klohr the ability to fully immerse herself in the baking industry within a professional kitchen facility and receive training in an array of subjects including culinary skills, food safety, career development and English language classes.

Keep Reading Show less

A young boy tried to grab the Pope's skull cap

A boy of about 10-years-old with a mental disability stole the show at Pope Francis' weekly general audience on Wednesday at the Vatican auditorium. In front of an audience of thousands the boy walked past security and onto the stage while priests delivered prayers and introductory speeches.

The boy, later identified as Paolo, Jr., greeted the pope by shaking his hand and when it was clear that he had no intention of leaving, the pontiff asked Monsignor Leonardo Sapienza, the head of protocol, to let the boy borrow his chair.

The boy's activity on the stage was clearly a breach of Vatican protocol but Pope Francis didn't seem to be bothered one bit. He looked at the child with a sense of joy and wasn't even disturbed when he repeatedly motioned that he wanted to remove his skull cap.

Keep Reading Show less