+
Apu's future on 'The Simpsons' is uncertain after Hank Azaria announces he'll stop doing his voice

Indian-American comedian Hari Kondabolu made a documentary in 2017 called "The Problem With Apu" which examined "The Simpsons" character, Kwik-E-Mart owner Apu Nahasapeemapetilon.

Kondabolu is a big fan of the show but has always been rankled by the stereotypical Indian character.

He told Vanity Fair that Apu is a flawed for a number of reasons, the most important being that he's "a white person's perception of an Indian immigrant."


Hank Azaria, the white man who does Apu's voice, watched the documentary and told TMZ that it made "some really interesting points." Azaria also voices Moe Szyslak, Chief Wiggum, Comic Book Guy, and the Sea Captain on the show.

"The Simpsons" addressed the controversy with a sorry-not-sorry response in 2018 in an episode entitled, "No Good Read Goes Unpunished." In one scene, Marge Simpson is reading a book that has been rewritten because it wasn't politically correct to her daughter Lisa. But Lisa complains she doesn't like the new version.

RELATED: Oprah's secret 1992 racism experiment on her audience is still incredible today

Then Lisa looks to the camera and says, "It's hard to say. Something that started decades ago, and was applauded and inoffensive, is now politically incorrect. What can you do?" she says before looking at her nightstand with a framed photo of Apu.

RELATED: A mother was ticketed in New York City while breastfeeding her child in a parked car

In 2018, Hank Azaria discussed the controversy on "The Late Show with Stephen Colbert."

"It has come to my attention more and more ... that people in the South Asian community in this country have been fairly upset by the voice and characterization of Apu," Azaria said.

"The idea that anybody who is young or old, past or present, was bullied or teased based on the character of Apu, it just really makes me sad," ge continued. "It was certainly not my intention. I wanted to bring laughter and joy with this character. The idea that it's brought pain and suffering — in any way — [or] that it's used to marginalize people, it is upsetting. Genuinely."

In the interview, Azaria revealed that the voice of Apu was inspired by Peter Sellers, a white man, who played an Indian character in the 1968 film, "The Party."

On Friday, Azaria told Slash Film he'd no longer be doing the voice of Apu.

"All we know there is I won't be doing the voice anymore, unless there's some way to transition it or something," Azaria said. "What they're going to do with the character is their call. It's up to them and they haven't sorted it out yet. All we've agreed on is I won't do the voice anymore."

While it remains to be seen what comes of Apu, the new development is a landmark moment for South-Asian representation in entertainment. It shows that society had progressed to the point where it is no longer funny for actors to do other-the-top ethnic stereotypes just to get a laugh. "The Simpsons" one of the most iconic comedy shows in television history, finally agrees.

True

Innovation is awesome, right? I mean, it gave us the internet!

However, there is always a price to pay for modernization, and in this case, it’s in the form of digital eye strain, a group of vision problems that can pop up after as little as two hours of looking at a screen. Some of the symptoms are tired and/or dry eyes, headaches, blurred vision, and neck and shoulder pain1. Ouch!

Keep ReadingShow less

Chris Hemsworth and daughter.

This article originally appeared on 08.27.18


In addition to being the star of Marvel franchise "Thor," actor Chris Hemsworth is also a father-of-three? And it turns out, he's pretty much the coolest dad ever.

In a clip from a 2015 interview on "The Ellen DeGeneres Show," Hemsworth shared an interesting conversation he had with his 4-year-old daughter India.

Keep ReadingShow less
Photo created from Burst

'The Daily Show' takes a look at two hot-button issues.

This article originally appeared on 10.06.15


A previous episode of "The Daily Show" addressed two hot-button issues at the same time: abortion and gun control.

It was one of the earliest tests for new host Trevor Noah, and he pretty much knocked this one out of the park. The segment began with a discussion about the pro-life movement's laser focus on making completely legal abortions really, really hard to get.

Noah started with the movement's push to defund Planned Parenthood on what turned out to be deceptive, altered, and debunked videos. And even he had to admit, pro-lifers are pretty great at what they do, given that they were able to get Congress to hold hearings based on ... nothing, really.

Keep ReadingShow less

This article originally appeared on 08.20.21


Sometimes you see something so mind-boggling you have to take a minute to digest what just happened in your brain. Be prepared to take that moment while watching these videos.

Real estate investor and TikTok user Tom Cruz shared two videos explaining the spreadsheets he and his friends use to plan vacations and it's...well...something. Watch the first one:

So "Broke Bobby" makes $125,000 a year. There's that.

How about the fact that his guy has more than zero friends who budget $80,000 for a 3-day getaway? Y'all. I wouldn't know how to spend $80,000 in three days if you paid me to. Especially if we're talking about a trip with friends where we're all splitting the cost. Like what does this even look like? Are they flying in private jets that burn dollar bills as fuel? Are they bathing in hot tubs full of cocaine? I genuinely don't get it.

Keep ReadingShow less
Pop Culture

Can't find the right word for a hard-to-describe emotion? Meet a man who makes them.

Have you ever thought, "Is that word just made up?" Well, you were right.

Image pulled from YouTube video linked to website.

Unique words defining emotions beyond the scope of a typical dictionary.

This article originally appeared on 07.02.15


What if you needed a word for something that you can't quite define? Where would you turn?

Have you ever tried to explain something but gave up because the person you're talking to wouldn't be able to relate? Or worse yet, there's not an actual word for what you're trying to explain?

Keep ReadingShow less