Musician Anderson .Paak hosts free community festival in LA to raise money for local nonprofit
Genesia Ting - @genesiatingphoto

.Paak with a young fan.


Between getting nominated for a Grammy for Best R&B Album, playing on Jimmy Kimmel with Smokey Robinson, and raising two sons with his wife Jae Lin, he has a lot on his plate.

But despite all his success, he never forgets his hometown of Oxnard, California, just north of Los Angeles. And he's giving back to the larger community that fostered his growth.


.Paak, Anthony Anderson and friends.Genesia Ting - @genesiatingphoto

On December 14, for the third consecutive year, .Paak and his team hosted Paak House in the Park, a family-friendly community event in Los Angeles' MacArthur Park benefitting his 501-C3, The Brandon Anderson Foundation (aka Paak House.)

The organization aims to "create a 'safe-haven' for the next generation, while cultivating alliances with like-minded non-profit organizations to generate a greater impact — together...through community outreach, sponsored events, summer programs, and after-school programs, all leading to establishing an actual .Paak House building, in an impacted community," according to its website.

Kids fill their backpacks with clothes and supplies.Rebecka Mercedes - @mrcdz_lenz

Living up to its mantra of "Uplift, Engage, Support," the event was donation-based and provided community services like free haircuts and stands to fill your own backpack with supplies. "Black-ish" star Anthony Anderson served as master of ceremonies for the event, which also showcased local kids' dance and music groups alongside a killer festival lineup including Anderson .Paak and the Free Nationals, Kali Uchis, The Game, Emily King, Thundercat, Mereba, Blueface, Kamasi Washington, and more.

Free haircuts on site. Rebecka Mercedes - @mrcdz_lenz

I got to attend and was blown away by the commitment to inclusivity, spirit, health,talent, and fun. Beyond the festival, .Paak House provides support with community outreach, sponsored events, summer programs, and after-school programs, all leading to the establishment of an actual .Paak House building in an impacted community in the near future. Last year they raised $155,000 for the foundation.

To people with power using their platforms for good. 💫


Check out photos below and make a tax-deductible donation to the Brandon Anderson Foundation here. See y'all in 2020!

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Kids get their faces painted.

Raven Iman - @raven50mm

Who doesn't love cotton candy?

Raven Iman - @raven50mm


The event kicked off with a stunning performance from the Los Angeles Parmelettes.

Genesia Ting - @genesiatingphoto


Free Ben & Jerry's for all.

Rebecka Mercedes - @mrcdz_lenz


Anthony Anderson does his best to compete with Tommy the Clown and co.

Genesia Ting - @genesiatingphoto

Mereba performs.

Genesia Ting - @genesiatingphoto


Let It Happen dance troupe performs (@norah_yarah_rosa on IG.)

Genesia Ting - @genesiatingphoto


Emily King performs.

Genesia Ting - @genesiatingphoto


Thundercat performs.

Genesia Ting - @genesiatingphoto


LA-native The Game performs with Anderson .Paak.

Genesia Ting - @genesiatingphoto


Kali Uchis performs.

Genesia Ting - @genesiatingphoto


Kamasi Washington and Maurice "Mobetta" Brown perform.

Raven Iman - @raven50mm


Seth Rogen cracks jokes.

Kristy Garcia - @lightboxla


The author at MacArthur Park. UPLIFT, ENGAGE, SUPPORT is .Paak House's mantra for community engagement.

Courtesy of Lucia Knell


Anderson .Paak hangs with Black Santa at .Paak House 2019.

Lucia Knell


Drummer DJ Beck, saxophonist Kamasi Washington, Thundercat, Anderson .Paak, Anthony Anderson, pianist Domi, Maurice "Mobetta" Brown and Jose Miguel Serrano Rios of the Free Nationals pose with the crowd.

Genesia Ting - @genesiatingphoto


Attendees enjoy the photo booth.

Rebecka Mercedes - @mrcdz_lenz


A mom and daughter enjoy the concert.


A dad and son enjoy the music.

Raven Iman - @raven50mm


💫

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Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday are teaming up to find the people who lead with love everyday.

Know someone in your neighborhood who's known for their optimistic attitude, commitment to bettering their community and always leading with love? Tell us about them for the chance to win a $2,000 grant to keep doing good in their community.

Nomination ends November 22, 2020

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