After a YouTuber catcalled his teenage daughter, comedian Skyler Stone called out his ignorance.

"Stop catcalling after women. Grow the f*** up."

via KEEM / Twitter

Catcalling should stop being explained away as a compliment or some type of innocuous flirtation. It's a serious problem that makes women and members of the LGBT community feel unsafe in public spaces.

Catcalling can also lead to more dangerous street harassment such as inappropriate touching or sexual assault.

Actor-comedian Sklyer Stone is getting love on social media for how he responded to a disgusting YouTuber catcalling his 15-year-old daughter on the street in Los Angeles.

Stone is a stand-up comedian who has appeared on "CSI: Crime Scene Investigation," "2 Broke Girls", and starred in his own Comedy Central series, "Con" in 2005.

YouTuber King Aladdin was live-streaming himself with a selfie stick on Cahuenga Boulevard when Stone and his daughter, Kylie, walked past. "Come here, come here. Where you going? Come here little Blondie. Little Taylor Swift-looking ass bitch," Aladdin called out to the teenager.

via KEEM / Twitter

Stone turned around and confronted Aladdin.

"She's 15 dude," Stone said.

"Hey bro, then why she out this late, bro? Why she out this late? This isn't Hollywood, bro," Aladdin responded.

"Why is she out this late? Because we just went on a father-daughter date, had dinner," Stone said.

Then, Aladdin started to drop his tough guy act and apologized.

"That's great," Aladdin said. "I apologize bro, I'm not trying to disrespect you in any way possible. I totally apologize."

"If I were you I would just shut the fuck up," Stone replied.

"No problem, sir. No problem. I didn't know she was 15," Aladdin said, as if it was okay to cat call women over the age of 15.

"Stop catcalling after women. Grow the fuck up," Stone responded.

After Stone walked away, Aladdin put on his tough guy persona again, trashing Stone for hanging out with his daughter and implying it was inappropriate. "She 15. Why's he hanging out with a 15-year-old girl. What a weirdo," Aladdin said.

Aladdin later deleted the video, but it was flagged and posted to Twitter.

Stone's reaction received praise on Twitter from people who respected the way he handled the interaction and stood up to catcalling.

After the video went viral, Aladdin posted an apology on YouTube.

"In the video I want to apologize to Skyler Stone," said Aladdin.

"I'm sorry for what I did to you the other night. It was embarrassing watching on my side. I'm sorry if I had ruined the night out with your daughter, I do apologize. More than likely I would have reacted the same way, whether it was my sister, daughter, whatever, I would have reacted the same way," he added.

But Stone hasn't accepted the apology because it was directed at him, not his daughter.

"It's super fake. He doesn't even address my daughter. It's directed at me...Make sure you talk to my daughter at some point. Because that's who you offended," Stone told Newsweek.

"Now my daughter's been really upset today because she saw the apology and she was crying earlier...she said 'I feel like as a woman I'm never going to be treated the same as a man,' he added.

If more people like Stone stand up to catcalling then one day women like Kylie could feel equal to men because they can walk down a public street without being harassed.

popular
Photo by Toni Hukkanen on Unsplash

Are looks more important than the ability to get through a long work day without ending up with eyes so dry and painful you wish you could pop them out of your face? Many employers in Japan don't permit their female employees to wear glasses while at work. Big shocker, male employees are totally allowed to sport a pair of frames. The logic behind it (if you can call it that) is that women come off as "cold" and "unfeminine" and – horror of all horrors – "too intelligent."

Women are given excuses as to why they can't wear glasses to work. Airline workers are told it's a safety thing. Beauty industry workers are told they need to see makeup clearly. But men apparently don't have the same safety issues as women, because they're allowed to wear their glasses square on the face. Hospitality staff, waitresses, receptionists at department stores, and nurses at beauty clinics are some of the women who are told to pop in contacts while they're on the clock.

Keep Reading Show less
Culture
via The Guardian / YouTube

Beluga whales are affectionately known as sea canaries for their song-like vocalizations, and their name is the Russian word for "white."

They are sociable animals that live, hunt, and migrate together in pods, ranging from a few individuals to hundreds of whales. However, they are naturally reticent to interact with humans, although some solitary belugas are known to approach boats.

Once such beluga that's believed to live in Norwegian waters is so comfortable among humans that it played fetch with a rugby ball.

Keep Reading Show less
popular

No reward comes without risk - or in the case of Vilnius - risquΓ©. The capitol city of Lithuania has a population of 570,000 and regularly makes lists as an underrated and inexpensive European destination. Lonely Planet called it a "hidden gem" of Europe. In 2016, it was rated the third cheapest destination for a bachelor party in Europe by FairFX. And you've probably never heard of it. In August of 2018, the city started running racy ads to increase tourism, calling it the "G-spot of Europe." The ad features a woman grabbing a map of Europe, clutching the spot where Vilnius is located. "Nobody knows where it is, but when you find it – it's amazing," reads the caption.

VILNIUS - THE G-SPOT OF EUROPE youtu.be

Keep Reading Show less
popular

The truth doesn't hurt for an elementary school teacher in California who's gone viral for teaching her class an empowering remix of one of Lizzo's hit songs.

Ms. Mallari β€” who teaches at Los Medanos Elementary School in Pittsburg, east of San Francisco β€” took the singer's song, "Truth Hurts," and reworked the lyrics to teach her students how to be great.

Lizzo's song made history this year for being the longest running number one single from a female rap artist. The catchy original lyrics are about boy problems, but Mallari's remix teaches her students about fairness, helping each other out, and embracing their own greatness.

Keep Reading Show less
popular