A researcher predicted where rising tides will force people to move. How did your city do?

The coast is kind of a favorites place. People love to visit, sit on the beach, and most of all, we really, really love to live there. But as much as humans like living near the ocean, we don't tend to like living in the ocean.

As the Earth gets warmer, melting ice caps and other forces could cause the average sea level to rise by as much as two meters by the year 2100. And to avoid living underwater, a lot of people might end up needing to move.


Move to where, exactly? Well, new data shows for many people the future is ... Texas.

In a paper published in Nature Climate Change, Mathew E. Hauer used demographic data and complex simulations to predict what the United States would be like by the year 2100.

1. Hauer's prediction? Austin's going to get even boomier.

Original photo from iStock.

The Austin area's already got a sky-high growth rate, but Hauer predicts it might end up getting an extra 800,000 residents with people moving in from the coasts. That's like adding an extra 40% of the current population!

A bit further away, the Houston and Dallas areas will end up getting about 318,000 and 265,000 people each.

2. Where would they come from? Some will be Texans, but a lot will probably be from Florida.

Original photo from iStock.

The Daytona Beach, Fort Myers, Key West, and Tampa areas could lose over 100,000 people each, but Miami might lose a whopping 2.5 million residents as it sinks into the ocean blue. Hauer predicts that about 460,000 Floridians will end up heading toward Orlando, but many will end up moving out of state.

3. Louisianans might also hop on over to the Lone Star State.

Original photo from iStock.

500,000 people might end up leaving the greater New Orleans area. Many might move upstate to the Baton Rouge area, which is predicted to gain about 185,000 residents. The state as a whole will probably lose about 460,000 people from sea level rise.

4. All along the East Coast, there'll be a general push inland.

Original photo from iStock.

Philadelphia and Washington, D.C., might get 140,000 and 218,000 new residents, respectively, as Atlantic City loses 124,000.

In North Carolina, Charlotte and Raleigh will gain about 265,000 residents combined as more than 300,000 move away from Norfolk (which is already seeing the effect of sea level rise at military bases).

5. If you think this will just affect coastal states, think again.

Original photo from iStock.

Las Vegas, Chicago, and Phoenix could each see more than 100,000 new residents thanks to sea level rise.

6. Finally, if you live in the Bay Area, you might end up needing to find a new plan.

Original photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images.

Hauer predicts that sea level rise could force over 250,000 people to leave the San Francisco/Oakland area by the year 2100.

These numbers are a fascinating look into the future — and what we'll need to do to prepare.

The good news is we still have time to react. The numbers shown reflect the most extreme scenario. Hauer's numbers would definitely go down if coastal cities implement adaptation strategies, like sea walls or raised roads.

But that leaves the question: Will they? And will the cities that experience growth be able to adapt as well? After all, many places, like Las Vegas or Phoenix, are already running into water management and growth problems of their own.

Of course, these are just predictions. Both human migration and climate change are complicated subjects. But even so, the overall message — that everyone, not just beachgoers, needs to pay attention to climate change — stays the same.

And that maybe we should prepare to spend a lot of time in Texas.

Photo by Louis Hansel on Unsplash
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This story was originally shared on Capital One.

Inside the walls of her kitchen at her childhood home in Guatemala, Evelyn Klohr, the founder of a Washington, D.C.-area bakery called Kakeshionista, was taught a lesson that remains central to her business operations today.

"Baking cakes gave me the confidence to believe in my own brand and now I put my heart into giving my customers something they'll enjoy eating," Klohr said.

While driven to launch her own baking business, pursuing a dream in the culinary arts was economically challenging for Klohr. In the United States, culinary schools can open doors to future careers, but the cost of entry can be upwards of $36,000 a year.

Through a friend, Klohr learned about La Cocina VA, a nonprofit dedicated to providing job training and entrepreneurship development services at a training facility in the Washington, D.C-area.

La Cocina VA's, which translates to "the kitchen" in Spanish, offers its Bilingual Culinary Training program to prepare low-and moderate-income individuals from diverse backgrounds to launch careers in the food industry.

That program gave Klohr the ability to fully immerse herself in the baking industry within a professional kitchen facility and receive training in an array of subjects including culinary skills, food safety, career development and English language classes.

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Dr. David McPhee offers advice for talking to someone living in a different time in their head.

Few things are more difficult than watching a loved one's grip on reality slipping away. Dementia can be brutal for families and caregivers, and knowing how to handle the various stages can be tricky to figure out.

The Alzheimer's Association offers tips for communicating in the early, middle and late stages of the disease, as dementia manifests differently as the disease progresses. The Family Caregiver Alliance also offers advice for talking to someone with various forms and phases of dementia. Some communication tips deal with confusion, agitation and other challenging behaviors that can come along with losing one's memory, and those tips are incredibly important. But what about when the person is seemingly living in a different time, immersed in their memories of the past, unaware of what has happened since then?

Psychologist David McPhee shared some advice with a person on Quora who asked, "How do I answer my dad with dementia when he talks about his mom and dad being alive? Do I go along with it or tell him they have passed away?"

McPhee wrote:

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