What does a scientist look like? Look no further than these badass women.

While women in STEM careers are traditionally underrepresented, it doesn't mean they're not there, kicking ass and capturing data all around the world.

Enter Science-a-thon, a one-day celebration of women in science to raise money for the Earth Science Women's Network, a nonprofit helping women in the field.

On July 13, 2017 (and a few folks on the 14th), female scientists took to Twitter and Instagram using the hashtag #DayOfScience to share photos and stories of their day, from routine observations to groundbreaking research.


The result is a rare look at what it's like to be a professional woman in science. It goes a little something like this.

1. It's never too early to get up and get to work. Science waits for no woman.

2. Some start the day with coffee. Others jump-start their mornings with natural uranium. To each her own.

3. Whether you're hard at work in the lab...

4. ...feeling the wind in your hair in the field...

5. ...or knocking out reports at your desk...

6. ...there's always something new to do and discover!

And confirming how awesome your discovery is is half the fun.

7. But that doesn't mean women in science are always off by themselves. After all, science is a team sport.

8. When it comes to saving the world, you can never have too much help.

9. Women in science also spend time teaching and presenting their findings.

10. Their lectures and mentorships mean we'll have #DayOfScience (and groundbreaking research) for years to come.

11. Being this badass doesn't happen overnight. It takes years of training, education, and hard work.

12. Especially when you're up against people who don't understand how valuable your work really is.

Cough cough, science is real, cough cough.

13. No matter what challenges stand in their way, women in science will continue to research, study, analyze, and record.

After all, it's what they do. And they're really freaking good at it.

14. At the end of the day, even these science superheroes get a break from saving the world.

15. After all the work they do, they certainly deserve it.

Miss out on Day of Science? No worries, there are still plenty of ways to get involved.

Visit a science museum. Tell your legislator that science and research are important to you. Learn more about the research happening at your local college or university. Donate to the Earth Science Women's Network, or other organizations that support women and girls in science, technology, engineering, and math. Remind the children in your life that women in science do legendary stuff every single day. And check out the hashtag #DayOfScience to see it for yourself.

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If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.