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nature

@texasbeeworks/Youtube

Imagine opening up a suitcase and finding an entire bee colony inside.

Bees can make a home practically anywhere, but their location choice isn’t always ideal, both for them and the humans they cohabitate with. Luckily, bee whisperers like Erika Thompson of Texas Beeworks specialize in moving colonies from their unusual makeshift living areas to places much more hospitable.

Thompson has helped relocate countless hives–found everywhere from backyard playgrounds to sheds to compost bins—all while documenting how it’s done. Plus she narrates the process with a voice so soft and soothing it doubles as an ASMR video. But really, it's her signature flair of doing it all with her bare hands that always leaves people completely floored.

Thompson recently rescued a beehive from a particularly unusual spot—a discarded suitcase.

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via Pexels

Geese swim beside each other on a pond.

Employees at the Riverside Cemetery in Marshalltown, Iowa, noticed that Blossom, a goose who lived on the grounds and in the pond, wasn’t doing well after her mate, Bud, passed away last August. CBS News reported that Blossom would often sit in front of shiny model tombstones and look at her reflection as if searching for a companion.

"We started to notice that she was really seeming lonely and isolating herself," general manager Dorie Tammen told the CBC. "It was clear that she was lonely and she needed a partner."

So Tammen created a personal ad for Blossom to find her a friend or a new mate. It’s possibly the only singles ad in history where someone was looking for a partner to live with them in a cemetery. The ad read:

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via Bob's Pennsylvania Wildlife Camera

Robert Bush Sr. is an avid outdoorsman who runs a Facebook page called "Bob's Pennsylvania Wildlife Camera."

He set up a secret camera on a log that lays across a steam to capture footage of all the different animals that walked across it. The result is a relaxing video featuring all sorts of wildlife including a black bear, chipmunk, coyote, turkey, and great horned owl.

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Science

17 photos of animals that prove there's nothing natural about traditional gender roles

These animals demonstrate the greatness of nature and its stubborn unwillingness to conform to human expectations for the way things "should be."

Image via Pixabay.

We have our eyes on you too.

Traditional gender roles are "natural," goes the common refrain.

Heterosexuality? That's natural too, apparently. Staying one gender your whole life? Definitely natural.

There's only one problem: Nature (and science) beg to disagree.

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