Through the magic of evolution there are countless instances where animals are so camouflaged to their environment, they're nearly impossible to see.

This helps them hide from predators or gives them cover to lash out and eat other animals.

The orca is black on top and white on the bottom so they're hard to identify from above or below.

Who'd notice this terrifying viper in the desert sand?


This seahorse perfectly blends into its environment.



But when human beings blend into the environment, it's not a miracle of nature, it's usually just dumb luck or poor fashion sense.

Here are ten times that things were camouflaged by pure coincidence.

Cat matches dog


The building is slowly fading into the sky.

Via Reddit user pachew96

This black car looks like a mirror after being washed

via Reddit User Tittzo

The cat in the carpet


The vines on the side of this house changed their color to match the siding.

via Reddit user ErnestoJesperson

She is the sea and the sky

via augustoberg / Instagram

The only time polka dots have worked as camouflage.

via Reddit user TheDoorBelllGuy

This woman is wearing the floor.


If she died right there, no one would notice.


This brings new meaning to the phrase, "Eat it or wear it."


Creepiest moment in a hotel since "The Shining"

Reddit user Wickensworth

Nature

Welcome to the Sloth Institute, a home for wayward baby sloths.

These sloths didn't have mothers, so this woman became their human substitute.

A sloth’s desire to cling to trees, other sloths, and people might seem adorable, but it’s actually the only way they can survive infancy.

Kermie the Sloth. All photos from Sam Trull, used with permission.

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UNESCO has officially removed the Belize Barrier Reef Reserve System, the world's second largest barrier reef, from its list of endangered world heritage sites.

It's a big deal for environmentalists and the people of Belize themselves: After all, it was voters who overwhelmingly (96%) approved measures to ban oil exploration and improve foresting regulations along the 200-mile reef.

"In the last two years, especially in the last year, the government of Belize really has made a transformational shift," said Fanny Douvere, who coordinates UNESCO's marine program.

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Heroes

Every once in a while, a hashtag comes along that is so pure and delightful, you wonder how you survived on the internet without it.

#RateASpecies is that hashtag.

It's a tongue-in-cheek hashtag that zoos, aquariums, and wildlife centers have been using to write humorous Amazon-style "reviews" of different animals. It's a silly, carefree way to learn real facts about the amazing creatures around us.

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