Is loud, industrial noise from underwater drilling affecting these pups? Scientists are on the case.

A team of scientists recently trained seal pups to execute a series of hearing tests — not unlike the ones you used to take in school.

Instead of raising their hand (or flippers, as it were) to indicate which side the noise is on, the seals are taught to tap a target with their nose when they hear a specific sound. If they get it right, they're rewarded with a delicious fish snack (unlike my doctor, who just scolds me for the umpteenth time about the importance of wearing earplugs at band practice.)

That's kind of what this pup is doing right here:


The seal hears the noise, taps the target (right) with its nose, and receives a delicious fish snack for its troubles. Image via Pinniped Cognition and Sensory Systems Laboratory.

They're trying to find a baseline understanding of just how well seals can hear underwater so they can understand how loud noises in the oceans might affect seal populations in the wild.

And what they found is that seals have pretty good hearing, particularly underwater — and especially at lower frequencies.

The seals' sensitivity toward deep bass tones is unsurprising. If you've ever gone swimming while there's loud music playing, or even a speaker system in the pool, you know that underwater acoustics tend to amplify and emphasize the deep, long waveforms of low bass notes.

This could also explain why "Kiss From a Rose" sounds better with a sick subwoofer system.

Get it? Seal? Like the singer? Ugh, never mind. GIF from "The Voice."

But you know what else gets even louder underwater? Industrial drilling.

I'm sure we can all share our own frustrating anecdotes of the constant thrumming from a nearby construction site making it almost impossible to work or sleep or just enjoy your life.

And if you thought that was annoying, well...

Welcome to life in the Arctic Circle.

Here, the low, low frequencies of mechanical oil drilling resonate through the waters and interrupt the lives of seals, whales, walruses, and countless other aquatic animals.

Those sounds aren't just loud and annoying; a lot of Arctic animals depend on their ability to communicate underwater. It's how they talk to each other. It's how they find food and fend off enemy attacks.

Could you imagine dealing with those loud construction sounds every single day no matter where you went? Yeah. It just might start to get to you after a while.


"How come it's so loud when there's no else around?!" Photo via NOAA/Wikimedia Commons.

Prolonged exposure to these sounds can lead to permanent deafness long after the drilling is done.

And it's not just drilling either. There are helicopters and exploding sea ice and fracking and seismic surveying and so on. All those sounds can travel for miles and miles across the ocean floor — that's why whales sing their songs the way they do.

While most of the evidence is currently anecdotal, researchers such as those at the Pinniped Laboratory above are actively gathering data in order to better predict the specific effects of this kind of acoustic violence seals and other marine life experience.

"Hi, yeah, I live upstairs, and I was just wondering — do you mind turning the massive industrial flotillas down? Some of us have to work in the morning." Photo by Andreas Trepte/Wikimedia Commons.

But even without the confirmed findings, it's clear that noise pollution is having a definite effect on underwater environments and the animals that live in them.

For example, have you ever heard the story of the world's loneliest whale? There's a whale named Alice, who made headlines earlier this year because she sings at an abnormally high frequency (for a whale). As a result, the other whales can't communicate with her, and she's spent the last 20 years swimming all alone and waiting for another whale to sing back to her.

That could easily be the future for every aquatic Arctic animal unless we humans step in and take action. (Unless they're eaten by a predator before the sadness sets in because they can't hear anything around them. But that's like even more bleak, so just forget I said anything.)

So you can see, the impacts of Arctic drilling extend far, far beyond the oil industry.

If we're not going to pay attention to climate change, then the least we can do is pay attention to the sensory experience of the animals that are already fighting everyday to survive. So let's tell President Obama to stop the rush to expand offshore drilling, which will cut down on noise pollution and ensure a safer future for animals and humans alike.

It might be too late for me to save my ears from that wretched rock 'n' roll music, but it's not too late for the pinnipeds (underwater carnivorous mammals).

Watch the seals ace their hearing test in the video below:

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On an old episode of "The Oprah Winfrey Show" in July 1992, Oprah put her audience through a social experiment that puts racism in a new light. Despite being nearly two decades old, it's as relevant today as ever.

She split the audience members into two groups based on their eye color. Those with brown eyes were given preferential treatment by getting to cut the line and given refreshments while they waited to be seated. Those with blue eyes were made to put on a green collar and wait in a crowd for two hours.

Staff were instructed to be extra polite to brown-eyed people and to discriminate against blue-eyed people. Her guest for that day's show was diversity expert Jane Elliott, who helped set up the experiment and played along, explaining that brown-eyed people were smarter than blue-eyed people.

Watch the video to see how this experiment plays out.

Oprah's Social Experiment on Her Audience www.youtube.com

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Cadbury has removed the words from its Dairy Milk chocolate bars in the U.K. to draw attention to a serious issue, senior loneliness.

On September 4, Cadbury released the limited-edition candy bars in supermarkets and for every one sold, the candy giant will donate 30p (37 cents) to Age UK, an organization dedicated to improving the quality of life for the elderly.

Cadbury was prompted to help the organization after it was revealed that 225,000 elderly people in the UK often go an entire week without speaking to another person.

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Well Being

Young people today are facing what seems to be greater exposure to complex issues like mental health, bullying, and youth violence. As a result, teachers are required to be well-versed in far more than school curriculum to ensure students are prepared to face the world inside and outside of the classroom. Acting as more than teachers, but also mentors, counselors, and cheerleaders, they must be equipped with practical and relevant resources to help their students navigate some of the more complicated social issues – though access to such tools isn't always guaranteed.

Take Dr. Jackie Sanderlin, for example, who's worked in the education system for over 25 years, and as a teacher for seven. Entering the profession, she didn't anticipate how much influence a student's home life could affect her classroom, including "students who lived in foster homes" and "lacked parental support."

Dr. Jackie Sanderlin, who's worked in the education system for over 25 years.

Valerie Anglemyer, a middle school teacher with more than 13 years of experience, says it can be difficult to create engaging course work that's applicable to the challenges students face. "I think that sometimes, teachers don't know where to begin. Teachers are always looking for ways to make learning in their classrooms more relevant."

So what resources do teachers turn to in an increasingly fractured world? "Joining a professional learning network that supports and challenges thinking is one of the most impactful things that a teacher can do to support their own learning," Anglemyer says.

Valerie Anglemyer, a middle school teacher with more than 13 years of experience.

A new program for teachers that offers this network along with other resources is the WE Teachers Program, an initiative developed by Walgreens in partnership with ME to WE and Mental Health America. WE Teachers provides tools and resources, at no cost to teachers, looking for guidance around the social issues related to poverty, youth violence, mental health, bullying, and diversity and inclusion. Through online modules and trainings as well as a digital community, these resources help them address the critical issues their students face.

Jessica Mauritzen, a high school Spanish teacher, credits a network of support for providing her with new opportunities to enrich the learning experience for her students. "This past year was a year of awakening for me and through support… I realized that I was able to teach in a way that built up our community, our school, and our students, and supported them to become young leaders," she says.

With the new WE Teachers program, teachers can learn to identify the tough issues affecting their students, secure the tools needed to address them in a supportive manner, and help students become more socially-conscious, compassionate, and engaged citizens.

It's a potentially life-saving experience for students, and in turn, "a great gift for teachers," says Dr. Sanderlin.

"I wish I had the WE Teachers program when I was a teacher because it provides the online training and resources teachers need to begin to grapple with these critical social issues that plague our students every day," she adds.

In addition to the WE Teachers curriculum, the program features a WE Teachers Award to honor educators who go above and beyond in their classrooms. At least 500 teachers will be recognized and each will receive a $500 Walgreens gift card, which is the average amount teachers spend out-of-pocket on supplies annually. Teachers can be nominated or apply themselves. To learn more about the awards and how to nominate an amazing teacher, or sign up for access to the teacher resources available through WE Teachers, visit walgreens.com/metowe.

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One of the major differences between women and men is that women are often judged based on their looks rather than their character or abilities.

"Men as well as women tend to establish the worth of individual women primarily by the way their body looks, research shows. We do not do this when we evaluate men," Naomi Ellemers Ph.D. wrote in Psychology Today.

Dr. Ellers believes that this tendency to judge a woman solely on her looks causes them to be seen as an object rather than a person.

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