In the heart of downtown Pittsburgh's cultural district is the city's smallest jazz club.

At the corner of Ninth and Liberty, you can see the 'burgh's hottest new club in action.


Can you see it? It's right there! GIFs via CBS Pittsburgh.

Now, this is no ordinary jazz club — it's actually a bus stop.

Zoom in, enhance, and voila, here it is:

Abracadabra (and a few months later), this bus shelter is now a jazz club. Photo by Amy Kline for Manchester Craftmen's Guild.

The project is the brainchild of Amy Kline, marketing manager of the Manchester Craftsmen's Guild, a staple in Pittsburgh's thriving jazz community.

"I dreamt the idea up after seeing some bus shelters the previous winter with a heating system installed," Kline told Upworthy. "I figured, if the bus shelter people can run a heater, they can play music."

Constructed inside a traditional bus shelter, the jazz club offers an interactive experience like no other.

The music is triggered by a sensor, and visitors can listen to a who's who from Pittsburgh's storied jazz scene. The shelter also features photos of local jazz legends like Stanley Turrentine (saxophone) and Ray Brown (bass), creating a truly multi-sensory experience.

Photos of Pittsburgh jazz legends Stanley Turrentine (left) and Ray Brown. Photo by Amy Kline for Manchester Craftmen's Guild.

The project was brought to life with financial support from the Awesome Foundation, which is a very real, and (unsurprisingly) awesome organization.

In 2014, Kline submitted a proposal for the the bus shelter to Awesome Pittsburgh, the local chapter of the Awesome Foundation. Each chapter awards $1,000 grants with no strings attached to encourage makers and dreamers to develop innovative projects around the arts, technology, or community development.

Awesome Pittsburgh unanimously selected Kline's proposal.

So far, the response from the Pittsburgh community has been overwhelmingly positive.

Kline is a frequent visitor to the shelter and says community members have been supportive. Bus passengers are enjoying the change.

Well, most of them.

A child plugs his ears to keep from falling under the bewitching spell of jazz.

The club may be small, but it has big potential.

Currently the shelter is on display until September 2015, though Kline is hoping it runs even longer. "I'd like to be able to continue it through December and change out the music for the holidays or a particular concert we are presenting, " she said.

For now, Kline is making the most of the summer. In late July, MCG is launching a series of free pop-up concerts inside the shelter. Follow along on their Facebook page for dates and times.

Projects like this are a win for public transportation and the community.

It's no secret public transit is wonderful tool for building strong communities and decreasing our carbon footprint, but many are still reluctant to ride.

Projects like Pittsburgh's Smallest Jazz Club offer a unique way to surprise and delight existing passengers and may boost ridership. Plus, the entire community can share and enjoy homegrown talent. It's an innovative project that hits all the right notes.

Selfies and photo ops are not uncommon at the bus shelter. Photo by Amy Kline for Manchester Craftsmen's Guild.

Want to see (and hear) Pittsburgh's smallest jazz club in action? Check out the video from CBS Pittsburgh.

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