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In the heart of downtown Pittsburgh's cultural district is the city's smallest jazz club.

At the corner of Ninth and Liberty, you can see the 'burgh's hottest new club in action.


Can you see it? It's right there! GIFs via CBS Pittsburgh.

Now, this is no ordinary jazz club — it's actually a bus stop.

Zoom in, enhance, and voila, here it is:

Abracadabra (and a few months later), this bus shelter is now a jazz club. Photo by Amy Kline for Manchester Craftmen's Guild.

The project is the brainchild of Amy Kline, marketing manager of the Manchester Craftsmen's Guild, a staple in Pittsburgh's thriving jazz community.

"I dreamt the idea up after seeing some bus shelters the previous winter with a heating system installed," Kline told Upworthy. "I figured, if the bus shelter people can run a heater, they can play music."

Constructed inside a traditional bus shelter, the jazz club offers an interactive experience like no other.

The music is triggered by a sensor, and visitors can listen to a who's who from Pittsburgh's storied jazz scene. The shelter also features photos of local jazz legends like Stanley Turrentine (saxophone) and Ray Brown (bass), creating a truly multi-sensory experience.

Photos of Pittsburgh jazz legends Stanley Turrentine (left) and Ray Brown. Photo by Amy Kline for Manchester Craftmen's Guild.

The project was brought to life with financial support from the Awesome Foundation, which is a very real, and (unsurprisingly) awesome organization.

In 2014, Kline submitted a proposal for the the bus shelter to Awesome Pittsburgh, the local chapter of the Awesome Foundation. Each chapter awards $1,000 grants with no strings attached to encourage makers and dreamers to develop innovative projects around the arts, technology, or community development.

Awesome Pittsburgh unanimously selected Kline's proposal.

So far, the response from the Pittsburgh community has been overwhelmingly positive.

Kline is a frequent visitor to the shelter and says community members have been supportive. Bus passengers are enjoying the change.

Well, most of them.

A child plugs his ears to keep from falling under the bewitching spell of jazz.

The club may be small, but it has big potential.

Currently the shelter is on display until September 2015, though Kline is hoping it runs even longer. "I'd like to be able to continue it through December and change out the music for the holidays or a particular concert we are presenting, " she said.

For now, Kline is making the most of the summer. In late July, MCG is launching a series of free pop-up concerts inside the shelter. Follow along on their Facebook page for dates and times.

Projects like this are a win for public transportation and the community.

It's no secret public transit is wonderful tool for building strong communities and decreasing our carbon footprint, but many are still reluctant to ride.

Projects like Pittsburgh's Smallest Jazz Club offer a unique way to surprise and delight existing passengers and may boost ridership. Plus, the entire community can share and enjoy homegrown talent. It's an innovative project that hits all the right notes.

Selfies and photo ops are not uncommon at the bus shelter. Photo by Amy Kline for Manchester Craftsmen's Guild.

Want to see (and hear) Pittsburgh's smallest jazz club in action? Check out the video from CBS Pittsburgh.

Joy

1991 blooper clip of Robin Williams and Elmo is a wholesome nugget of comedic genius

Robin Williams is still bringing smiles to faces after all these years.

Robin Williams and Elmo (Kevin Clash) bloopers.

The late Robin Williams could make picking out socks funny, so pairing him with the fuzzy red monster Elmo was bound to be pure wholesome gold. Honestly, how the puppeteer, Kevin Clash, didn’t completely break character and bust out laughing is a miracle. In this short outtake clip, you get to see Williams crack a few jokes in his signature style while Elmo tries desperately to keep it together.

Williams has been a household name since what seems like the beginning of time, and before his death in 2014, he would make frequent appearances on "Sesame Street." The late actor played so many roles that if you were ask 10 different people what their favorite was, you’d likely get 10 different answers. But for the kids who spent their childhoods watching PBS, they got to see him being silly with his favorite monsters and a giant yellow canary. At least I think Big Bird is a canary.

When he stopped by "Sesame Street" for the special “Big Bird's Birthday or Let Me Eat Cake” in 1991, he was there to show Elmo all of the wonderful things you could do with a stick. Williams turns the stick into a hockey stick and a baton before losing his composure and walking off camera. The entire time, Elmo looks enthralled … if puppets can look enthralled. He’s definitely paying attention before slumping over at the realization that Williams goofed a line. But the actor comes back to continue the scene before Elmo slinks down inside his box after getting Williams’ name wrong, which causes his human co-star to take his stick and leave.

The little blooper reel is so cute and pure that it makes you feel good for a few minutes. For an additional boost of serotonin, check out this other (perfectly executed) clip about conflict that Williams did with the two-headed monster. He certainly had a way of engaging his audience, so it makes sense that even after all of these years, he's still greatly missed.

Noe Hernandez and Maria Carrillo, the owners of Noel Barber Shop in Anaheim, California.

Jordyn Poulter was the youngest member of the U.S. women’s volleyball team, which took home the gold medal at the Tokyo Olympics last year. She was named the best setter at the Tokyo games and has been a member of the team since 2018.

Unfortunately, according to a report from ABC 7 News, her gold medal was stolen from her car in a parking garage in Anaheim, California, on May 25.

It was taken along with her passport, which she kept in her glove compartment. While storing a gold medal in your car probably isn’t the best idea, she did it to keep it by her side while fulfilling the hectic schedule of an Olympian.

"We live this crazy life of living so many different places. So many of us play overseas, then go home, then come out here and train,” Poulter said, according to ABC 7. "So I keep the medal on me (to show) friends and family I haven't seen in a while, or just people in the community who want to see the medal. Everyone feels connected to it when they meet an Olympian, and it's such a cool thing to share with people."

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Memories of childhood get lodged in the brain, emerging when you least expect.

There are certain pleasurable sights, smells, sounds and tastes that fade into the rear-view mirror as we grow from being children to adults. But on a rare occasion, we’ll come across them again and it's like a portion of our brain that’s been hidden for years expresses itself, creating a huge jolt of joy.

It’s wonderful to experience this type of nostalgia but it often leaves a bittersweet feeling because we know there are countless more sensations that may never come into our consciousness again.

Nostalgia is fleeting and that's a good thing because it’s best not to live in the past. But it does remind us that the wonderful feeling of freedom, creativity and fun from our childhood can still be experienced as we age.

A Reddit user by the name of agentMICHAELscarnTLM posed a question to the online forum that dredged up countless memories and experiences that many had long forgotten. He asked a simple question, “What’s something you can bring up right now to unlock some childhood nostalgia for the rest of us?”

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