We could lose 110 million good nights of sleep thanks to climate change.

It's finally summer! Which means fun, sun, and nights of melting into your sheets.

GIF from "Adventure Time"/Cartoon Network.

Long nights of trying to find the cool side of your pillow might be more common in the future.


A paper published on March 25, 2017, in the journal Science Advances found that climate change, in addition to affecting just about every other facet of life, might keep us up at night too.

The researchers found two things: 1. Yes, it sucks to sleep in hot weather, and 2. We better get used to it.

As we lie down for the night, our internal body temperatures fall. This is a natural part of falling asleep. If it's too warm out, our bodies struggle to cool down, which can make sleep harder.

The researchers compared self-reported CDC data from 765,000 U.S. residents with weather data and climate models. They found that raising the temperature one degree Celsius would disrupt 110 million nights of sleep each year in the United States.

Mapped out, the effect would hit hardest in the western and northern United States, especially around Wyoming, Minnesota, and northern New York.

Bad sleep can make people irritable and make it harder to think. It's been linked to car accidents and increased blood pressure. You can even start hallucinating if you don't get some shut-eye!

Luckily, there are things you can do to get better sleep, both today and in the future.

If you're already sweating, there are ways to stay cool at night. The air conditioner is an obvious choice but can suck up energy. For low-tech options, buckwheat pillows can stay cooler at night. There are chill-able pillows and mattress pads as well (or you can make your own: fill a bottle with ice water or throw a sock filled with rice in the freezer for 30 minutes). You could also ditch the big fabric mattress for a hammock.

Of course, in the long-term, the more we limit climate change, the less we'll have to deal with this. Luckily, there are a ton of ways to both fight climate change and protect the environment.

Sleep tight!

Heroes
Photo by Danielle MacInnes on Unsplash

There's a difference between dieting and being healthy, and often times, overattention to what you consume can lead to disordered eating. Eating disorders are dangerous and can affect anyone, but they're especially concerning in adolescents. Which is why WW (formerly Weight Watchers) is facing intense criticism for its new app, Kurbo, targeted toward kids ages eight to 17.

The app uses a traffic light system to tell kids which foods are a "green light" and can be eaten as much as they want, which foods are a "yellow light" and should be consumed with caution, and which "red light" foods they should probably avoid.

It seems like a simple system to teach kids what's good for them and what's not, but it regulates kids' diets in an unhealthy way. Gaining weight is a normal, healthy part of child development. Putting on a few pounds means your body is doing what it's supposed to do. While the app classifies foods with too much fat or calories as "red," children need to consume some of these foods to develop their brain.

WW is calling the app "common sense." As Gary Foster, the chief science officer of WW, puts it, items in the red foods category "aren't foods that should be encouraged in kids' diets, but they also shouldn't be vilified or demonized, and there has to be a system that's simple and science-based that highlights that so everyone in the family can understand."

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Well Being
via Ostdrossel / Instagram

Lisa is a lifelong bird enthusiast who goes by the name Ostdrossel on social media. A few years ago, the Germany native moved to Michigan and was fascinated by the new birds she encountered.

Upon arriving in the winter, she fell in love with the goldfinches, cardinals, and Blue Jays. Then in the spring, she was taken by the hummingbirds.

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via Stratford Festival / Twitter

Service dogs are invaluable to their owners because they are able to help in so many different ways.

They're trained to retrieve dropped Items, open and close doors, help their owners remove their clothes, transport medications, navigate busy areas such as airports, provide visual assistance, and even give psychological help.

The service dog trainers at K-9 Country Inn Working Service Dogs in Canada want those who require service dogs to live the fullest life possible, so they're training dogs on how to attend a theatrical performance.

The adorable photos of the dogs made their way to social media where they quickly went viral.

On August 15, a dozen dogs from Golden Retrievers to poodles, were treated to a performance of "Billy Elliott" at the Stratford Festival in Ontario, Canada. This was a special "relaxed performance" featuring quieter sound effects and lighting, designed for those with sensory issues.

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"It's important to prepare the dogs for any activity the handler may like to attend," Laura Mackenzie, owner and head trainer at K-9 Country Inn Working Service Dogs, told CBC.

"The theater gives us the opportunity to expose the dogs to different stimuli such as lights, loud noises, and movement of varying degrees," she continued. "The dogs must remain relaxed in tight quarters for an extended period of time."

The dogs got to enjoy the show from their own seats and took a break with everyone else during intermission. They were able to familiarize themselves with the theater experience so they know how to navigate through crowds and fit into tight bathroom stalls.

via Stratford Festival / Twitter


via Stratford Festival / Twitter


via Stratford Festival / Twitter

"About a dozen dogs came to our relaxed performance, and they were all extremely well-behaved," says Stratford Festival spokesperson Ann Swerdfager. "I was in the lobby when they came in, then they took their seats, then got out of their seats at intermission and went back — all of the things we learn as humans when we start going to the theater."

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The dogs' great performance at the trial run means that people who require service animals can have the freedom to enjoy special experiences like going to the theater.

"It's wonderful that going to the theater is considered one of the things that you want to train a service dog for, rather than thinking that theater is out of reach for people who require a service animal, because it isn't," Swerdfager said.

The Stratford Festival runs through Nov. 10 and features productions of "The Merry Wives of Windsor," "The Neverending Story," "Othello," "Billy Elliot," "Little Shop of Horrors," "The Crucible" and more.

Inclusivity